Other verbs like courir?

DianeC1Kwiziq community member

Other verbs like courir?

Does courir have this quirky root because it is part of that messy 3rd group of verbs, and is grouped with things like aller, faire, prendre, voir, pouvoir, vouloir, devoir,. Is it right there's no real pattern here, you just have to learn them?

Asked 4 years ago
MaxC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

The inflection in the speaker below doesn't comporte with the sentence status as a question: there is no rise in the voice as the end of the sound clip. I suggest this be fixed. It jumped right out at me.

Et vous courrez tous les matins?And you will run every morning?

MaxC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Yup! There are I believe 73 different French verb forms (with exceptions within many of these, to boot), if my Bescherelle is up to date. As I have written elsewhere, the French do what they can to avoid tricky verbs and frequently, in my observation, screw them up when they try. Once you learn French really well, you'll catch a lot of C2 mistakes, even with news presenters. When they make a mistake live, they are visibly embarrassed and correct themselves immediately. It's not an unusual for me to correct my native French teachers. Today I explained to a well educated Frenchman that is a transitive French verb in good standing. I learn new words every day in English. My new English word for the day in "nous" which has a special meaning in England and a second meaning in use everywhere. I love English, my native language.

MaxC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Yup! There are I believe 73 different French verb forms (with exceptions within many of these, to boot), if my Bescherelle is up to date. As I have written elsewhere, the French do what they can to avoid tricky verbs and frequently, in my observation, screw them up when they try. Once you learn French really well, you'll catch a lot of C2 mistakes, even with news presenters. When they make a mistake live, they are visibly embarrassed and correct themselves immediately. It's not an unusual for me to correct my native French teachers. Today I explained to a well educated Frenchman that is a transitive French verb in good standing. I learn new words every day in English. My new English word for the day in "nous" which has a special meaning in England and a second meaning in use everywhere. I love English, my native language.

Other verbs like courir?

Does courir have this quirky root because it is part of that messy 3rd group of verbs, and is grouped with things like aller, faire, prendre, voir, pouvoir, vouloir, devoir,. Is it right there's no real pattern here, you just have to learn them?

Sign in to submit your answer

Don't have an account yet? Join today

Ask a question

Find your French level for FREE

Test your French to the CEFR standard

Find your French level
Clever stuff happening!