Passé Composé instead of Imparfait

CraigC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Passé Composé instead of Imparfait

Why is the first sentence, "I've always loved school."  translated in the Passé Composé instead of Imparfait: "J'ai toujours adoré l'école" ?  This seems to fit the pattern of giving a description (of me in my past), and since it's "always", it doesn't seem to have a clear beginning and end in the past.

Asked 2 years ago
MaartenC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor Correct answer

Passé composé is always used if toujours or jamais apply for something that was true in past and remains true in the present. Use of imparfait with toujours or jamais indicates true in past but not any longer. In this sentence ‘J’adorais toujours l’école’  would indicate ‘I always liked/loved (used to like/love) school’ - but that is not the case anymore and would leave the French listener wondering why ?  See link for a very good coverage (in comprehensible French, subtitles available if needed) on past tense usage - this aspect is covered towards the end of the lesson (in advanced level aspects, from memory) .

https://youtu.be/3rpQ5xeFneg

CraigC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Thank you Maarten for the clear answer and the youtube link.  I don't remember seeing this aspect of past tense covered in the A2-level lessons, maybe it should be added?

Passé Composé instead of Imparfait

Why is the first sentence, "I've always loved school."  translated in the Passé Composé instead of Imparfait: "J'ai toujours adoré l'école" ?  This seems to fit the pattern of giving a description (of me in my past), and since it's "always", it doesn't seem to have a clear beginning and end in the past.

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