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"Soit que .... , soit que ..."

ElijahC1Kwiziq community member

"Soit que .... , soit que ..."

I just read "soit que" somewhere and I wonder if it means the same. If not, what is the difference? The googled explanation didn't really make sense... 

Asked 4 months ago
JimC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor Correct answer

Hi Elijah,

Taking Chris's example:-

 "Nous nous verrons demain, soit que j'aille chez vous, soit que vous veniez chez moi."

I would translate this as:-

"We will get together tomorrow BE THAT I go to your place, BE THAT you come to mine."

The lesson uses the term "either" but I find it helpful to think of it as "be that" to match the French.

I just mention this because it may help your understanding?

Jim

ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

soit..soit is used when followed by anything other than a verb (there are examples given in the lesson).

soit que..soit que is used when a verb action follows:

 Nous nous verrons demain, soit que j'aille chez vous, soit que vous veniez chez moi.

HarryC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

I would translate "sois que ..., soit que ..." as "whether ..., or ...", although Jim's somewhat archaic translation might be helpful as an aide mémoire.

HarryC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

I would translate "sois que ..., soit que ..." as "whether ..., or ...", although Jim's somewhat archaic translation might be helpful as an aide mémoire.

"Soit que .... , soit que ..."

I just read "soit que" somewhere and I wonder if it means the same. If not, what is the difference? The googled explanation didn't really make sense... 

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