Are what we in the US call run-on sentences OK in French? Are prices always written using numbers? Thanks!

LizC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Are what we in the US call run-on sentences OK in French? Are prices always written using numbers? Thanks!

Asked 2 years ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Liz,

Prices are always written in figures.

Could you give me an example of the run-on sentences you mean ?

LizC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Cécile, next time I spot a run-on sentence, I’ll send a message. I thought prices were always written in figures, too, but the lesson required quatre euros to be spelled out. Perhaps it’s because the customer was being told verbally the price.

In any event, I am learning! Thanks so much for an outstanding site. 

MichaelB1Kwiziq community member

A run-on sentence means two or more sentences in a row without being separated by a coordinating conjunction (and, but, or, nor, so, for, yet) or by a semi-colon.  It's technically incorrect in American English but much more acceptable in British English.  An example would be.  "He is going she is not." I have seen many examples in French of run-on sentences; however, I am not sure if it truly is an error in French.)

(I teach English. A run-on sentence does not mean a rambling or very long sentence as many people think. Also, if you separate the sentences with "however," "therefore," "nevertheless," etc., that doesn't work either. If you are a strict grammarian (a "purist"!), you must always use a semi-colon or a coordinating conjunction to separate sentences.)

Are what we in the US call run-on sentences OK in French? Are prices always written using numbers? Thanks!

Sign in to submit your answer

Don't have an account yet? Join today

Ask a question

Find your French level for FREE

Test your French to the CEFR standard

Find your French level
I'll be right with you...