Avoir a passer

DanielleC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Avoir a passer

Can you tell me why it's "avoir à passer du temps" rather than "avoir passer du temps"?  From the lessons I would think the version without "à" would express "having to spend".

Also, in the last phrase it is difficult to understand whether  they wanted a phrase to describe that he would become  a person who translates any language instantly or he would instantly become a universal translator. Are those two things written differently?


Asked 2 years ago
CélineKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Bonjour Danielle, 

1. avoir à + verb  -  avoir :

Chris's answer is great! 

Avoir à + verb = must / to have to  - avoirto have / to possess

2. Instant universal translator:

an instant universal translator ->un traducteur universel instantané
instantly a universal translator -> instantanément un traducteur universel / or / un traducteur universel instantanément

I hope this is helpful.

Bonne journée !

ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

That's a good question.

J'ai du temps à passer. -- I have some time to spend. Here "have" is used in the meaning of "possessing" some time to spend, i.e., having time available to spend.
J'ai à passer du temps. -- I have to spend some time. Here the meaning is that I "must" spend some time.

Avoir a passer

Can you tell me why it's "avoir à passer du temps" rather than "avoir passer du temps"?  From the lessons I would think the version without "à" would express "having to spend".

Also, in the last phrase it is difficult to understand whether  they wanted a phrase to describe that he would become  a person who translates any language instantly or he would instantly become a universal translator. Are those two things written differently?


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