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Avoir raison

Helen H.B1Kwiziq community member

Avoir raison

I've always heard "avoir raison" translated as/used more like "to have a point" than "to be right", and to that end have always thought of it as fairly informal. Seeing it translated as "to be right" leads me to wonder whether it's a little more versatile in terms of tone than I'd thought?
Asked 2 years ago
Maarten K.C1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor Correct answer

Helen, the main point is the verb use in the context of indicating a person ‘is correct/right’ - ie avoir, not être. Avoir raison is correct speech in any level of discussion.

Just as in English, people can also have reasons - des raisons, good arguments (points) - de bons arguments or de bonnes questions etc, 

Jim J.C1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Hi Helen,

As "avoir raison" -- locution verbal (elegant verbal phrase) or "raison" as noun feminine

Have a look here:

https://www.wordreference.com/fren/raison

and here 

http://bdl.oqlf.gouv.qc.ca/bdl/gabarit_bdl.asp?Th=2&t1=&id=2336

I think these links may give you the range of meanings that you are looking for.

Hope it helps.

Jim

Avoir raison

I've always heard "avoir raison" translated as/used more like "to have a point" than "to be right", and to that end have always thought of it as fairly informal. Seeing it translated as "to be right" leads me to wonder whether it's a little more versatile in terms of tone than I'd thought?

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