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Avoir raison / tort / de la chance = To be right / wrong / lucky

Look at these sentences:

Nous avons de la chance.
We are lucky.

Luc a tort et j'ai raison.
Luc is wrong, and I'm right.

Vous avez toujours raison.
You are always right.

Je n'ai pas de chance.
I am not lucky.

The verb avoir (to have) is used to express being right (avoir raison), wrong (avoir tort) or lucky (avoir de la chance).

 

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Vous avez toujours raison.
You are always right.


Nous avons de la chance.
We are lucky.


Luc a tort et j'ai raison.
Luc is wrong, and I'm right.


Je n'ai pas de chance.
I am not lucky.


Micro kwiz: Avoir raison / tort / de la chance = To be right / wrong / lucky
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Q&A

Almut

Kwiziq community member

2 April 2018

6 replies

She is lucky - elle est chanceuse.

"Elle est chanceuse" should be accepted too. The second link provided by Ron (https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english-french/lucky) event lists "chanceux" as translation of "lucky".

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

20 April 2018

20/04/18

Hi Almut,


If I can just interject here, I have never heard anyone in France using the expression 'être chanceux' for 'to be lucky' . You will hear 'avoir de la chance' or 'avoir de la veine' (which is slang) .


I suspect 'être chanceux/chanceuse' might be the expression our French Canadian friends favour...


Hope this helps!

Chris

Kwiziq community member

2 April 2018

2/04/18

Hi Almut,


Often times there are multiple correct ways to answer each question in kwiziq. However, as the lessons are designed to train a particular aspect of grammar or style, it isn't really helpful to search for alternative answers which have little to do with the lesson at hand.


In the example you provide, the lessons aimes (among other things) to train the use of "avoir de la chance". Hence a construction using this phrase is sought as the correct answer.


-- Chris (not a native speaker).

Almut

Kwiziq community member

3 April 2018

3/04/18

I encountered this sentence in a test and had no way of seeing a connection to a particular lesson. As long as they are not downright wrong all possible answers should be accepted. Otherwise I would have to learn answers by heart and would only learn "kwiziq-French" and not real French.

Chris

Kwiziq community member

4 April 2018

4/04/18

I understand your frustration when, after giving a well considered and perfectly correct answer, it is marked as incorrect. Believe me, I've "been there, done that". It would, however, be nigh impossible to write a program which is smart enough to recognize all possible correct ways to answer a question. When I was marked incorrect, I read the corresponding lesson and learned what kwiziq was trying to teach me. Next time around knew what they were after.


-- Chris.

Almut

Kwiziq community member

4 April 2018

4/04/18

Well actually, I would not expect "a program which is smart enough to recognize all possible correct ways to answer a question" but rather I would expect Kwiziq to have *people* smart enough to recoginze correct answers and to feed a database from which the program checks the replies that users give in tests. This is actually the reason why I reported this issue - in hope it would be fed to the database. Otherwise we are backt to my point of learning "kwiziq-French" instead of real French.

Chris

Kwiziq community member

11 April 2018

11/04/18

I am coming at this from a different angle, Almut. You are not learning "kwiziq-French" but you are using kwiziq to focus on learning specific aspects of French. By breaking language learning down into managable, bite-sized tasks which can be learned and tested for in a comparatively short amount of time, you speed up your progress overall.


Of course, besides going through lessons and tests, one needs to read, listen to and speak French as well. And this is where all possible nuances of expressions and a feeling for their proper uses is acquired. Not during the tests, which are geared toward teaching specific grammatical topics. The kwiziq team acknowledges this by offering reading and listening opportunities as well.


-- Chris.

Gary

Kwiziq community member

2 September 2017

1 reply

The only way to remember this is to say " I have luck, I have wrong, I have right " etc.

Ron

Kwiziq community member

3 September 2017

3/09/17

Bonjour Gary,
For the most part, that is correct; however, that is not how it would translate from French into English as that is the literal translation.
Another case in point is avoir + age. In English we say «I am 15 years old»; however, in French that becomes «j'ai quinze ans» ---> literally, I have 15 years. But in English we would simply state that I am 15 years old.
Bonne chance.

Nicholas

Kwiziq community member

9 April 2017

3 replies

why not "tu es chanceux"

Ron

Kwiziq community member

10 April 2017

10/04/17

It is similar to J'ai faim or J'ai soif. The same grammar rule applies. The use of être changes the whole meaning of the phrase.
Regardez cela: https://progress.lawlessfrench.com/my-languages/french/view/3130

Ron

Kwiziq community member

10 April 2017

10/04/17

En fait, voici une autre référence de la dictionnaire Collins-Robert:
https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english-french/lucky

Catriona

Kwiziq community member

1 January 2018

1/01/18

Chanceuse is used by the Parliament of Canada on its website: "Certains diront qu'elle est chanceuse puisque l'attente moyenne pour une audience est de 19 mois et qu'elle a attendu neuf mois de moins que [...]", so why does KwizIQ say elle a de la chance is the only option?

Randa

Kwiziq community member

5 August 2016

1 reply

is 'tort, raison' for feminine and masculine?

Laura

Kwiziq language super star

5 August 2016

5/08/16

Bonjour Randa,

Yes, because they're not adjectives in French - they're nouns. J'ai raison is equivalent to "I'm right" in English, but literally it means "I have reason."

Olivia

Kwiziq community member

1 February 2016

1 reply

What's the difference between saying de chance and de la chance?

As in the examples above where with je there is no la and with nous there is a la?

Laura

Kwiziq language super star

2 February 2016

2/02/16

Bonjour Olivia,

The expression is "avoir de la chance," as shown in the example "Nous avons de la chance." Also, J'ai de la chance, Tu as de la chance, etc.

But when you change it to a negative, "de la" changes to "de": Nous n'avons pas de chance, Je n'ai pas de chance, Tu n'as pas de chance, etc.

Here's a lesson: https://www.french-test.com/my-languages/french/view/23

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