Dans cet exercice, il est écrit «angine» pour «mal de gorge». Je pensais que "l'angine" avait à voir avec le coeur?

ConnieC1Kwiziq community member

Dans cet exercice, il est écrit «angine» pour «mal de gorge». Je pensais que "l'angine" avait à voir avec le coeur?

Asked 11 months ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Connie, 

There are indeed two meanings to 'angine' in French :

The first one refers to 'tonsillitis' and the other ,

'angine de poitrine' is angina which refers to a heart condition..

Hope this helps!

ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

There is "angina pectoris" which is a condition of the heart and "angina tonsillaris", generally an inflammation of the tonsils or the throat. Very different medical conditions. In general usage and without additional specification, "angina" us normally interpreted as a condition of the throat.

ConnieC1Kwiziq community member
Thank you both!  Is “angine” the more commonly used term for “sore throat” in France?
CécileKwiziq team member

You can say - 'mal de gorge' for just a sore throat but among the many hypochondriacs (malades imaginaires) in France it could easily escalate to 'une angine'....    ;-)

ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Une angine is a purulent inflammation of the throat/tonsillis. It is not a medical term, strictly speaking, but more in colloquial use. A throat ache is also not a diagnosis per se but a symptom of many maladies.

An angina pectoris is a precursor to a heart attack. It arises from diminished blood supply to the heart.

OK, enough of med-speak.

Dans cet exercice, il est écrit «angine» pour «mal de gorge». Je pensais que "l'angine" avait à voir avec le coeur?

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