Does -battu really have an irregular past participle

RobertC1Kwiziq community member

Does -battu really have an irregular past participle

This lesson has me scratching my head with the simple question - why is it here? One of the very few things I remember from O level french (failed) was that regular past participles form ER>é, IR>i and RE>u so to my way of thinking battre follows the regular rule. Maybe this is because french is taught differently in France than it was in England 40 years ago, I remember reading somewhere that the french don't have the same concept of group 3 (-RE) verbs but have several smaller groups including -DRE.

Asked 7 months ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi 

I have checked and the verb 'battre' and its derivatives stand on its own for conjugation purposes, hence the separate lesson.

Hope this helps!

ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

The past participle of battre really is battu. Whatever rule says otherwise is simply wrong in this case.

AlanC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Robert isn't arguing about that, Chris. He's just questioning why it needs a separate lesson when it follows the normal pattern for -RE verbs. Battre is irregular in the present tense (je bats not je batts), but it's regular in the passé composé. It seems that English-speaking grammar books classify verbs a bit differently from French (-RE instead of -DRE), but even English grammar books will list battre as irregular.

https://progress.lawlessfrench.com/my-languages/french/glossary/42

Does -battu really have an irregular past participle

This lesson has me scratching my head with the simple question - why is it here? One of the very few things I remember from O level french (failed) was that regular past participles form ER>é, IR>i and RE>u so to my way of thinking battre follows the regular rule. Maybe this is because french is taught differently in France than it was in England 40 years ago, I remember reading somewhere that the french don't have the same concept of group 3 (-RE) verbs but have several smaller groups including -DRE.

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