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Does the presence of a verb in the clause after "trouve" distinguish the two uses from each other?

Yulyvrdcapbilvsyy Z.C1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Does the presence of a verb in the clause after "trouve" distinguish the two uses from each other?

Elle trouve que Sam EST belle.

versus

Elle trouve Sam ennuyeuse.


Does it work as a guide/rule that:

The presence of a conjugated verb after "trouve que" suggest both that

1) "trouve que" is being used in the sense of "think/find that...(clause)," and also

2) that "que" is necessary in the formation of such a sentence?

For comparison: "Elle trouve Sam est belle" would be grammatically incorrect.

Asked 3 years ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi,

Verbs of opinion like 'trouver''considérer' can be used on their own or with que introducing another clause.

They mean  juger, regarder comme,  tenir pour which is to consider / to judge someone to be something

Je la trouve gentille I find her kind

( my opinion of her is that she is kind) 

but you can also say 

Je trouve qu'elle est gentille 
Il te trouve ennuyeux / Il trouve que tu es ennuyeux = He finds you boring 
Elle le trouve beau / Elle trouve qu'il est beau = She thinks he is handsome 
Il te considère chanceux / Il considère que tu es  chanceux He think you are lucky 

If you introduce another verb you have to add the 'que' to link the two clauses.

If you use 'penser' you will always use que.

Je pense qu'il est odieux I think he is odious

Hope this helps!

Jim J.C1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Hi Y

"Je trouve Martha intéressante. I find Martha interesting". 

The above is from the lesson.

"Elle trouve Sam est belle"   --> She finds/thinks Sam to be/is beautiful. Seems to me that this statement is consistent with the lesson, so grammatically valid.
Jim 

Chris W.C1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

If there are two subjects, you need que and also a proper verb for the second subject.

Elle trouve que Sam est belle. Elle is the first subject, Sam is the second. Trouve is the first verb, est the second.

Elle trouve Sam belle. Elle is the only subject, Sam is the COD.

Does the presence of a verb in the clause after "trouve" distinguish the two uses from each other?

Elle trouve que Sam EST belle.

versus

Elle trouve Sam ennuyeuse.


Does it work as a guide/rule that:

The presence of a conjugated verb after "trouve que" suggest both that

1) "trouve que" is being used in the sense of "think/find that...(clause)," and also

2) that "que" is necessary in the formation of such a sentence?

For comparison: "Elle trouve Sam est belle" would be grammatically incorrect.

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