“Elle est coincée là-haut depuis plus de cinq heures”. Please explain why “est coincée” is in the present tense and not in the past tense.

JudyC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

“Elle est coincée là-haut depuis plus de cinq heures”. Please explain why “est coincée” is in the present tense and not in the past tense.

Asked 1 year ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Judy,

This is the rule in French, please take a look at the following Kwiziq lesson which will give you other examples -

https://progress.lawlessfrench.com/revision/grammar/how-you-use-depuis-since-for-with-le-present-and-not-le-passe-compose-prepositions-of-time

 

JudyC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Thanks for the reply.

Now what about “Ca fait plus de cinq heures qu’elle est coincee la-haut’.” “Dupuis” is not used but “est coincee” is still in the present tense and not the past tense.  I was unable to use the accents here.

Thanks.

CécileKwiziq team member

Hi Judy,

It would be the same for the similar expressions 'il y a ... que...', and 'ça fait ... que...'  indicating the same type of action which are true today and carrying on at the time of speaking. 

e.g

I you wanted to say 'you had not been drinking alcohol for six months' you could say:

Il y a  six mois que je ne bois plus d'alcool

Ça fait six mois que je ne bois plus d'alcool

Je ne bois plus d'alcool depuis six mois 

et ça continue...

Hope this helps!

JudyC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Thanks for your assistance. I understand it now.

“Elle est coincée là-haut depuis plus de cinq heures”. Please explain why “est coincée” is in the present tense and not in the past tense.

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