black friday cyber monday last chance to save 25% on all packages »

Fatiguer et se fatiguer

HeatherC1Kwiziq community member

Fatiguer et se fatiguer

In the example “il se fatigua vite mais ils ne fatiguèrent qu’à la fin de la  journée” is there a reason why the verb is reflexive in the first phrase, but not in the second?

Asked 1 year ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Heather, 

This is an interesting question and the difference is very subtle -

il se fatigua vite = he got tired very quickly

ils ne fatiguèrent qu'à la fin de la journée they only tired ( of something they were doing) at the end of the day

Bonne continuation!

DinaC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

The difference is so subtle that i dont get it. Would appreciate more of explanation... Thanks in advance

JamesonC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Replying to Dina:  Think of 'se fatiguer' as a compund verb(or phrasal verb) 'get tired' similar to se perdre  'to get lost' VS  fatiguer (to tire) or perdre to lose.

Then it should follow logically why one has a reflexive pronoun (se fatiguer/se perdre) as the object(receiver of the verbs action...

and the other (like perdre) has a direct object or has either no object  or an object following a preposition(like fatiguer).  

I got tired from walking==Je me suis fatigué de marcher.

i got lost while walking==je me suis perdu en marchant

The walk tired me== La marche m'a fatigué

I lost my way while walking == J'ai perdu mon chemin en marchant.

Fatiguer et se fatiguer

In the example “il se fatigua vite mais ils ne fatiguèrent qu’à la fin de la  journée” is there a reason why the verb is reflexive in the first phrase, but not in the second?

Sign in to submit your answer

Don't have an account yet? Join today

Ask a question

Find your French level for FREE

Test your French to the CEFR standard

Find your French level
Getting that for you now...