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I have just eaten my breakfast = I just ate my breakfast?

LeslieB2Kwiziq community member

I have just eaten my breakfast = I just ate my breakfast?

In terms of translating into French, it seems that the two phrases above are equivalent in meaning. All the examples use a construction in English that is correct but not necessarily how people would say it. It would be quite normal and grammatically correct to say the simpler phrase, "I just ate my breakfast." Would someone ever use the passe compose in the "venir de + infinitive", and if so, what does it mean in English? I expect that the venir in the pluperfect + infinitive would mean "I HAD just [done something]."

Asked 1 year ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Leslie, 

This is an interesting question regarding the use of 'venir de' to say, you have just done something, a very near past.

In fact you can only use two tenses in French -

The présent :

Je viens de vous le dire = I have just said it to you 

or in a story , the imparfait -

She had just said it to her/him elle venait de lui dire 

Bonne Continuation!

 

I have just eaten my breakfast = I just ate my breakfast?

In terms of translating into French, it seems that the two phrases above are equivalent in meaning. All the examples use a construction in English that is correct but not necessarily how people would say it. It would be quite normal and grammatically correct to say the simpler phrase, "I just ate my breakfast." Would someone ever use the passe compose in the "venir de + infinitive", and if so, what does it mean in English? I expect that the venir in the pluperfect + infinitive would mean "I HAD just [done something]."

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