Je devrai / je devrais

PaulC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Je devrai / je devrais

In this exercise “I should maybe call the train company” is translated as “je devrai ... “, but “I should really insure my phone” is “je devrais ...” . It’s only a very small detail (and I believe both are pronounced the same, or almost the same, by most people anyway), but why is the future of devoir used in one case and the conditional in the other? 

Asked 1 year ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi, 

Thanks, Paul for reporting this error on 'devrais', it has been flagged up and has been corrected.

Regarding the other point 'elles' does refer to 'mes affaires' which means my things/my belongings and is the subject of m'ont coûté.

SheilaB2Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

I thought exactly the same

SheilaB2Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor
surtout quand elles m'ont coûté la peau des fesses ! also, especially as IT cost me an arm and a leg, But you wanted the answer:surtout quand elles m'ont coûté. which is they cost??
CarlB2Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

This is for Sheila.  Elles because you are referring to les affaires (plural).  I think this is a trick question.  I used it referring to a cell phone.  But I see the reason for their usage.

Je devrai / je devrais

In this exercise “I should maybe call the train company” is translated as “je devrai ... “, but “I should really insure my phone” is “je devrais ...” . It’s only a very small detail (and I believe both are pronounced the same, or almost the same, by most people anyway), but why is the future of devoir used in one case and the conditional in the other? 

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