"Plus" usually means "more". Then the sentance, Il n'a plus de billes, should read, I do not have anymore marbles. Where does "left" come from?

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Roy

Kwiziq community member

21 October 2018

3 replies

"Plus" usually means "more". Then the sentance, Il n'a plus de billes, should read, I do not have anymore marbles. Where does "left" come from?

This relates to:
N'avoir plus de = To have none left (negation) -

Chris

Kwiziq community member

22 October 2018

22/10/18

Hi Roy,

Translating between languages isn't a mathematical science. The upshot is that the sentence Je n'ai plus de billes carries the same meaning as the English "I don't have anymore marbles" or "I don't have anymore marbles left". Either of those English versions would translate to the same French sentence.

Roy

Kwiziq community member

22 October 2018

22/10/18

Thanks guys. My problem was that my answer to a recent kwiz question was determined, not "right" because I "left" out the "left". Lol. Salut

Chris

Kwiziq community member

22 October 2018

22/10/18

I empathize with you. It is, after all, just a dumb computer comparing strings of letters without regard for their meaning. 

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