Prevoir vs Organiser/planifier

GaryC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Prevoir vs Organiser/planifier

Why "prevoir" for "nous avons prévu d'aller..." instead of "nous avons organisé (or planifié)?

I understand "prevoir " to mean "foresee" , but if she made plans then it would seem to me organisé or planifié would be more accurate.  Thanks.


Asked 10 months ago
MaartenC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor Correct answer
Prévoir has broader meaning than you previously thought - the teaching value of listening to (and of reading) lots of native spoken French !

 

It also can carry the meaning of more than just 'intending' - also of having made the appropriate preparations, reservations, etc. This doesn't mean that planifier or organiser, or other words couldn't have been used here instead:

https://www.larousse.fr/dictionnaires/francais/pr%C3%A9voir/63883 

https://dictionnaire.lerobert.com/definition/prevoir

https://www.dictionnaire-academie.fr/article/A9P4272

ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

the verb prévoir can mean many things, among which is also "to plan". I suggest you refer to a decent online dictionary.

TomC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

I agree with you in thinking of prévoir as usually synonymous with 'foresee'. But I usually find these equivalences aren't strict and I see in Larousse that prévoir is defined as various kinds of thinking-in-advance. Perhaps 'envisage' is sometimes a good alternative translation for this word.

GaryC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

THanks for all your comments.  Very helpful!

Prevoir vs Organiser/planifier

Why "prevoir" for "nous avons prévu d'aller..." instead of "nous avons organisé (or planifié)?

I understand "prevoir " to mean "foresee" , but if she made plans then it would seem to me organisé or planifié would be more accurate.  Thanks.


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