Profiteroles et choux

N. Hilary (Shamrockhill)C1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Profiteroles et choux

Merci Aurelie. 

Miam !  Everything looks so good. I can't decide what to have!

I learned a new use of the word: "choux", from your definition of Profiteroles: (re: choux filled with ice cream).  I was a little confused at first knowing that "choux" means "cabbage" in French, but I had never heard the term used in American English.

However, according to Collin's English dictionary, it is a noun in Bristish English meaning: 

"a very light pastry made with eggs, used for eclairs, etc"

Collins English Dictionary. Copyright © HarperCollins Publishers Word 


"origin: partial translation of French pâte choux cabbage dough (from its round shape)"


Merci et Bon Apetit !

Asked 8 months ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Hilary, 

Thank you for your kind comment which I will pass on to Aurélie.

You may (or not) also be aware of the term of endearment 'mon petit chou' which is often translated wrongly by 'my little cabbage' but stands instead for -

mon petit chou (à la crème) = my little sweet bun/puff

Bonne Continuation !

N. Hilary (Shamrockhill)C1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Merci Cecile,

Yes, I am familiar with the phrase, "Mon petit chou".  I was reminded of it while doing this exercise and wondered, (not for the first time), what was the origin of this term of endearment?

Now, I can share your explanation with my husband who will be happy to know the real meaning behind the words. He has always thought it a bit odd and questioned why the French call their loved ones "my little cabbage"! "My little sweet puff/bun" is so much more endearing!

Merci et Bonne continuation.

SteveA1Kwiziq community member

Profiteroles and Eclaires are made with choux pastry 

Profiteroles et choux

Merci Aurelie. 

Miam !  Everything looks so good. I can't decide what to have!

I learned a new use of the word: "choux", from your definition of Profiteroles: (re: choux filled with ice cream).  I was a little confused at first knowing that "choux" means "cabbage" in French, but I had never heard the term used in American English.

However, according to Collin's English dictionary, it is a noun in Bristish English meaning: 

"a very light pastry made with eggs, used for eclairs, etc"

Collins English Dictionary. Copyright © HarperCollins Publishers Word 


"origin: partial translation of French pâte choux cabbage dough (from its round shape)"


Merci et Bon Apetit !

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