Que

Petros

Kwiziq community member

23 December 2018

3 replies

Que

It would seem "Qu'ont fait les hommes" is an accepted sentence. According to the logic of this article, it should be "Que les hommes ont-ils fait." Can anyone explain this difference? Is one of these wrong? Is there some exception for "que?"

This question relates to:
French lesson "Forming inverted questions with nouns in Le Passé Composé (conversational past)"

Chris

Kwiziq community member

23 December 2018

23/12/18

These are just two different ways of forming questions. Either is correct.

Alan

Kwiziq community member

23 December 2018

23/12/18

Yes, I think "que" is an exception.

This lesson (and the associated lesson for the present tense) describes what's known as "complex inversion", where you put the noun first, then use an additional pronoun for the inversion. With "simple inversion" you just invert the noun and verb. The lesson seems to imply that you always have to use complex inversion with nouns, but I believe this is an oversimplification - it actually depends on what the question word is, and various other aspects of the sentence.

In particular, with "que" you can only use simple inversion.

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

24 December 2018

24/12/18

Hi, 

You can also say :

"Qu'est-ce que les hommes ont fait?"

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