"que d'habitude, d'habitude" translated as "as usual, usually" - not sure how this parses out?

MartinKwiziq community member

"que d'habitude, d'habitude" translated as "as usual, usually" - not sure how this parses out?

Asked 1 month ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Martin,

Just to add to Maarten's excellent answer 'd'habitude' can be both 'usual' and 'usually' and we use both as translation in this sentence.

Not sure if you know the expression 'comme d'habitude' (as usual) which always reminds me of Claude François' song with the same title. Paul Anka wrote new English lyrics for Frank Sinatra and it became his signature song - 'My Way'.

 

Showing my age here but interesting little fact methinks!

If you want more info take a look at -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comme_d%27habitude

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w22haP4hgsQ

Hope you enjoy it!

 

MaartenC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Martin, 

the translation is simply reflecting what the reporter has said. 

This is French as it is spoken, live cross, off the cuff, on the fly - the reporter notes that the travel time is effectively ‘two-fold more than normal’, then quickly includes a description of normal, and returns to his original train of thought to complete the picture of just how severe the problem is. 

There are other English translations that fit, but whether ‘… as usual, usually it is ..’ or ‘…. than normal, normally it is...’ or another suitable choice, the repetition is true to the original content. 

His maths goes a bit awry too !

"que d'habitude, d'habitude" translated as "as usual, usually" - not sure how this parses out?

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