Questionable English?

MarkC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Questionable English?

Will you swing by her place ? by the neck or au  Tarzan. That is not standard English for me even though I get the gist.
Asked 1 year ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Mark, 

I have changed it to 'pop by' in accordance with the lesson on the various uses of the verb 'passer' which we used in another lesson.

Passer can be used with avoir or être in Le Passé Composé... and changes meaning

I think it is a better translation.

 

MaartenC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Mark, this is regional difference in English. A well known phrase in some parts of the English speaking world.

MarkC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Yes.. That's why it needs to be standard English and not colloquial!

MarkC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

That sound much better. Cheers!

AnitaC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

I’m familiar with the use of ‘wing’, so eg. “I’ll wing by your place later” intimating something that’s quick not a bother. I’ve also heard ‘they winged it” - they ran away

MarkC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Now, winged it for me means chancing it.. not at all the same thing! As in pretending to have done your homework and hoping you don't get asked a question.

Questionable English?

Will you swing by her place ? by the neck or au  Tarzan. That is not standard English for me even though I get the gist.

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