The construction: "tout oppose le"

ErrolC1Kwiziq community member

The construction: "tout oppose le"

I am puzzled by "tout oppose le" in the following announcement.

À l’occasion des élections européennes, le 26 mai, deux philosophes sont têtes de liste. De l’accueil des réfugiés à la gestation pour autrui (GPA), tout oppose le Français François-Xavier Bellamy et le Belge Laurent de Sutter qui se lancent en politique sans rien renier de leurs convictions métaphysiques.

The first sentence is clear. The second sentence mentions (1) the questions of the refugees and surrogacy, and (2) Bellamy and de Sutter who are entering politics, etc. But I do not understand how "tout oppose le" links (1) and (2). Does it mean Bellamy and de Sutter are opposed to (1)? If so, what is the "le" doing there? I can't work out the meaning here. Any help would be much appreciated.

CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Errol,

That sentence you would probably be translated something like :

"The French man .... and the Belgian .... are totally opposed on the question of the refugees at the GPA..."

in English.

Hope this helps!

ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

"Tout oppose" is one part and the "le" belongs to "le Français".

Does that help you?

ErrolC1Kwiziq community member

Thanks, Chris. Yes, I was a bit dumb not to realise that. I've since also found out how the "tout oppose" construction works, so that's great. Thanks for your help.

ErrolC1Kwiziq community member

Thank you, Cécile. I understand it now.

The construction: "tout oppose le"

I am puzzled by "tout oppose le" in the following announcement.

À l’occasion des élections européennes, le 26 mai, deux philosophes sont têtes de liste. De l’accueil des réfugiés à la gestation pour autrui (GPA), tout oppose le Français François-Xavier Bellamy et le Belge Laurent de Sutter qui se lancent en politique sans rien renier de leurs convictions métaphysiques.

The first sentence is clear. The second sentence mentions (1) the questions of the refugees and surrogacy, and (2) Bellamy and de Sutter who are entering politics, etc. But I do not understand how "tout oppose le" links (1) and (2). Does it mean Bellamy and de Sutter are opposed to (1)? If so, what is the "le" doing there? I can't work out the meaning here. Any help would be much appreciated.

Sign in to submit your answer

Don't have an account yet? Join today

Ask a question

Find your French level for FREE

Test your French to the CEFR standard

Find your French level
Clever stuff underway!