Translation of 'Don’t let it get you down'

HarryC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Translation of 'Don’t let it get you down'

The phrase 'Don’t let it get you down' is generally translated into French as 'Ne te laisse pas abattre'. But, literally, the phrase appears to mean 'Don't let yourself cut down'. Wouldn't better ways to say it in French be 'Ne le laisse pas t'abattre' or 'Ne te laisse pas être abattu'?

Are there any other phrases like this, where the active voice is translated as passive?

[And why is my question suddenly centre justified?]

Asked 1 week ago
MaartenC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor Correct answer

 

The French expression is "ne pas se laisser abattre". It is similar in meaning and is used in similar contexts to the English 'don't let it get you down' (and other equivalents).  It is already in the pronominal form - 'se laisser abattre' effectively can be translated as 'to let/allow (oneself) be knocked/cut down' (or similar).

It is not a literal translation - expressions often aren't,  and they do not always make sense in their native language either !

See wordreference as linked by Jim, and Larousse.

https://www.larousse.fr/dictionnaires/francais/abattre/59#locution

JimC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Hi Harry,

See here:  https://www.wordreference.com/fren/abattre

Looks like the term needs to be "ne pas se laisser abattre"

Jim

ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

@Jim: isn't that exactly what Harry quoted?

JimC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor
@ Chris     No!    "Ne te laisse pas abattre." is what was asked  I wrote "ne pas se laisser abattre"
HarryC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

@Jim - Thanks for your contribution, but it doesn't resolve my question. All you've done is put the problem into the infinitive. The literal meaning is still in the active voice: 'not to let yourself cut down', not 'not to let yourself be cut down'.

HarryC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Thanks to everyone. I guess it's just one of those idioms that all languages have and that make no literal sense. It's still a niggle, though, why people don't say 'Ne le laisse pas t'abattre'.

Translation of 'Don’t let it get you down'

The phrase 'Don’t let it get you down' is generally translated into French as 'Ne te laisse pas abattre'. But, literally, the phrase appears to mean 'Don't let yourself cut down'. Wouldn't better ways to say it in French be 'Ne le laisse pas t'abattre' or 'Ne te laisse pas être abattu'?

Are there any other phrases like this, where the active voice is translated as passive?

[And why is my question suddenly centre justified?]

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