Where is "du" for masculine countries/states/regions?

ThyB1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Where is "du" for masculine countries/states/regions?

Hi,

I think this lesson needs to be updated.

Because I learned in another lesson that: (Venir de/d'/du/des = To come/be from with countries/states/regions and continents (French Prepositions)):

De + feminine countries/states/regions

Du + masculine countries/states/regions

In this lesson, you only mention "de," which confuses me a lot at first to see all the examples are used with only "de". I had to cross-check between two lessons to see if I was understanding correctly.

If I'm wrong, please pardon me.

Have a nice day.

Asked 7 months ago
MaartenC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor Correct answer

Thy, not sure if I understand the question. 

There are examples of ‘du ….’ in the first lesson you linked - …. du Pays de Galles, for instance. 

The 2nd link is about cities - which as a general rule do not take an article. Therefore for most cities it is just ‘ venir de (city) ‘. The only exceptions are those where the article is a part of the actual name  eg Le Havre (m) - in which case it becomes ‘ venir du (Havre) ‘, or La Rochelle (f) when it becomes ‘ venir de La Rochelle ‘ 

À = To/in and De = From/of with cities in French (French Prepositions of Location)

BiancaC1Kwiziq community member

Actually there is not a single mention of 'du' in this lesson, but you ask that question, e.g. I come from Monaco should be Je viens du Monaco, not as explained in this lesson 'de'. 
You only have de, d' & d'où in your examples.

MaartenC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Bianca, 

I am not sure which lesson you are referring to as not having any examples of ‘ du ‘, as the lesson linked below does have some.

Monaco is considered a ‘country’ under international classification, so wouldn’t be expected to appear in a lesson on cities.

However, Monaco does not take a definite article, so it is ‘ venir de Monaco ‘.

There is a small number of countries that don’t take articles - Monaco is one . You can check country genders at Laura Lawless link. 

Venir de/d'/du/des = To come/be from with countries/states/regions and continents (French Prepositions) 

https://www.lawlessfrench.com/vocabulary/countries-and-continents/

Where is "du" for masculine countries/states/regions?

Hi,

I think this lesson needs to be updated.

Because I learned in another lesson that: (Venir de/d'/du/des = To come/be from with countries/states/regions and continents (French Prepositions)):

De + feminine countries/states/regions

Du + masculine countries/states/regions

In this lesson, you only mention "de," which confuses me a lot at first to see all the examples are used with only "de". I had to cross-check between two lessons to see if I was understanding correctly.

If I'm wrong, please pardon me.

Have a nice day.

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