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Je viens de + [city] = I'm from + [city]

To talk about where you are from in French, you will use the verb venir (to come).

Look at these questions:

Informal/singular questions:

D'où viens-tu?
Where do you come from?

Tu viens d'où?
Where are you from?

Formal/plural questions:

D'où venez-vous ?
Where are you from?

Vous venez d'où ?
Where are you from?

Note that: 

D'où is the contraction of de + où (from + where)
- De becomes d' because it's followed by a vowel (où).


Now look at these answers:

Je viens de Londres.
I am from London.

Je viens de Paris.
I am from Paris.

Je viens de Hong Kong.
I am from Hong Kong.

To say which city you are from in French, you will use the following expression:

Je viens de + [city]


ATTENTION:

If the city name begins with a vowelde becomes  d' :

Je viens d'Édimbourg.
I am from Edinburgh.

Je m'appelle Caroline et je viens d'Avignon.
My name is Caroline and I am from Avignon.

Je viens d'Omaha.
I come from Omaha.


See more complex cases in Using 'à' (to/in) and 'de' (from/of) with cities (prepositions) 

See also the more advanced lesson on how to conjugate all six forms of venir in Le Présent:
Conjugate venir, tenir and derivatives in Le Présent (present tense) 

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Je m'appelle Caroline et je viens d'Avignon.
My name is Caroline and I am from Avignon.


Vous venez d'où ?
Where are you from?


Je viens de Londres.
I am from London.


D'où venez-vous ?
Where are you from?


Je viens d'Édimbourg.
I am from Edinburgh.


Tu viens d'où?
Where are you from?


D'où viens-tu?
Where do you come from?


Je viens d'Omaha.
I come from Omaha.


Je viens de Madrid.
I am from Madrid.


Je viens de Hong Kong.
I am from Hong Kong.


Je viens de Paris.
I am from Paris.


Q&A

Elaine

Kwiziq community member

30 May 2018

1 reply

vous venez d'ou?

Chris

Kwiziq community member

30 May 2018

30/05/18

Did you have a question?

Georgia

Kwiziq community member

5 February 2018

3 replies

Comment conjuguez-vous avec il, elle, ils, elles et nous>

Georgia

Kwiziq community member

5 February 2018

5/02/18

Chris

Kwiziq community member

5 February 2018

5/02/18

Hi Georgia,


here is the conjugation of "Je viens de Vienne."



Je viens de Vienne.
Tu viens de Vienne.
Il/elle/on vient de Vienne.


Nous venons de Vienne.
Vous venez de Vienne.
Ils/elles viennent de Vienne.



I hope that's helpful to you.  -- Chris (not a native speaker).

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

16 April 2018

16/04/18

Bonjour Georgia !


Here is the link to our lesson on the full conjugation of venir in Le Présent:


https://progress.lawlessfrench.com/revision/grammar/conjugate-venir-tenir-and-derivatives-in-le-present-present-tense


Bonne journée !

Shivam

Kwiziq community member

15 January 2018

1 reply

Comment vous vous appelez?

Chris

Kwiziq community member

15 January 2018

15/01/18

What's your question?

-- Chris.

randolf

Kwiziq community member

20 December 2017

2 replies

je viens de manila.

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

20 December 2017

20/12/17

Bonjour Randolf !

Good sentence, just one thing :


Je viens de Manille.

Bonne journée !

Fred

Kwiziq community member

22 December 2017

22/12/17

je viens d'aux États-Unis

Vernon

Kwiziq community member

3 December 2017

3 replies

Do city names have gender?

According to the lesson below, you have to use de/du depending on a country's gender. Is it the same for cities? https://french.kwiziq.com/my-languages/french/tests/results/1861632/system?quick-lesson-popup=1

Ron

Kwiziq community member

4 December 2017

4/12/17

Bonsoir Vernon,
Yes, city names have a gender. which is covered in a different lesson at the A1 level; here is that lesson link:
https://progress.lawlessfrench.com/my-languages/french/view/3119

J'espère que ma réponse vous aiderait.
Bonne chance et bonne continuation dans vos études en français, la langue de Molière et qui a été utilisée par le monde français depuis l’époque d’Hugues Capet

Ron (un locuteur non natif )

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

15 March 2018

15/03/18

Hi Vernon,


Although you don't need to worry about the gender of most towns or cities in the expression , 'Venir de', as in the case of single word places it will always be


Je viens de Paris, je viens de Londres, je viens d'Amsterdam, je viens de Nice ...


In the case of towns which use an article in their name it will be,


je viens du Havre (because the town is Le Havre )


Je viens de La Rochelle ( because the town is La Rochelle)  


je viens des Sables d'Olonne ( the town is Les Sables d'Olonne) etc...


When you start talking about towns and cities or describing them you will need to use a gender and some will be feminine or masculine. Some will have an article in front of them like, La Havane , La RochelleLe Creusot which will determine whether they are feminine or masculine. Some will have an adjective in their name like, Mantes-la-Jolie which will indicate their gender. But in the majority of single word cases, there are no rules to indicate whether a city or town is masculine or feminine except when you use the adjectives 'vieux', 'grand', 'nouveau' or 'tout' in front of  them which  will always be masculine in this case, e.g. Le Vieux Nice, le grand Bruxelles, le nouveau Belleville, Le tout-Paris...


Hope this helps!


 

Desi

Kwiziq community member

18 March 2018

18/03/18

Djordje

Kwiziq community member

10 September 2017

2 replies

Je viens de Serbia.

Ron

Kwiziq community member

10 September 2017

10/09/17

Bonjour Djordje,
Very good practice phrase with one small correction: Je viens de Serbie. In French Serbia becomes Serbie.
I hope you find this helpful,
bonne chance

Djordje

Kwiziq community member

13 September 2017

13/09/17

Bonjour,
Merci for your corection.

Jimmy

Kwiziq community member

2 September 2017

1 reply

, I think I might be starting to understand. Thank you for the repetition.

Ron

Kwiziq community member

3 September 2017

3/09/17

Bonjour Jimmy,
Assuming that you are a native English speaker, we often forget in learning a second or even third language how we learned English. It was not that we picked it up in a year or two, it was by rote, that is that, for most of us in the US who had a minimum of 12 years in school, we were immersed in English daily and we went over the same things for the most part repetitively. And after those 12 years, we came out of school with varying levels in vocabulary:
"Nagy and Anderson (1984) estimated that an average high school senior knows 45,000 words, but other researchers have estimated that the number is much closer to 17,000 words (D'Anna, Zechmeister, & Hall, 1991) or 5,000 words (Hirsh & Nation, 1992)."
As you can see, the studies vary from 5000 words to 45,000 words. The point being, that no matter the size of our vocabulary upon graduation, it was learned by repetition and usage.
The same holds for learning French, it is by repetition and usage that we will become proficient. The largest problem that we have living in the US, is we are not exposed on a day over day basis to the language and culture of French, i.e. we are not immersed in it, like we would be having grown up in France or another French speaking country nor by being in that milieu daily.
Bonne chance et bonne continuation dans vos études en français.

Arpan

Kwiziq community member

22 August 2017

3 replies

Je veins de Mumbai en Inde

Is it correct?

Ron

Kwiziq community member

22 August 2017

22/08/17

Bonjour Arpan,
Votre français, c'est exact.
Alors, voici une autre façon syntaxique de dire la même phrase.
Je suis originaire de Mumbai en Inde
J'espère que c'est utile pour vous.
Bonne chance et bonne continuation en vos études de français.

Ron

Kwiziq community member

22 August 2017

22/08/17

Je m'excuse. Il y a une petite faute d’orthographe.
«veins» , cela aurait dû être «viens».

Arpan

Kwiziq community member

23 August 2017

23/08/17

Merci Beaucoup !!

ANAGHA

Kwiziq community member

16 April 2017

3 replies

is '' i come from india = je veins de india

ANAGHA

Kwiziq community member

16 April 2017

16/04/17

can anybody help me with this question

Heera

Kwiziq community member

18 April 2017

18/04/17

Bonjour Anagha!
I believe "I come from India" would be "Je viens d'Inde"
Since Inde begins with a vowel de contracts to d'.
Hope it's helpful. :)

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

18 April 2017

18/04/17

Bonjour Anagha !

Heera is right !
Here is a link to our lesson on how to express "in/to" + countries in French, which varies from the city case :)
https://progress.lawlessfrench.com/revision/grammar/use-en-with-feminine-countries-and-aux-with-masculine-countries-to-say-in-or-to-prepositions

À bientôt !

Freddi

Kwiziq community member

24 December 2016

2 replies

Tu vien d'o?

Freddi

Kwiziq community member

24 December 2016

24/12/16

It's suppose to be "Tu vien d'ou?" Right?

Mandeep

Kwiziq community member

13 January 2017

13/01/17

Yes It is .. where do you come from?
How has your day been?