Je viens de + [city] = I'm from + [city]

To talk about where you are from in French, you will use the verb venir (to come).

Look at these questions:

Informal/singular questions:

D'où viens-tu?
Where do you come from?

Tu viens d'où?
Where are you from?

Formal/plural questions:

D'où venez-vous ?
Where are you from?

Vous venez d'où ?
Where are you from?

Note that: 

D'où is the contraction of de + où (from + where)
- De becomes d' because it's followed by a vowel (où).


Now look at these answers:

Je viens de Londres.
I am from London.

Je viens de Paris.
I am from Paris.

Je viens de Hong Kong.
I am from Hong Kong.

To say which city you are from in French, you will use the following expression:

Je viens de + [city]


ATTENTION:

If the city name begins with a vowelde becomes  d' :

Je viens d'Édimbourg.
I am from Edinburgh.

Je m'appelle Caroline et je viens d'Avignon.
My name is Caroline and I am from Avignon.

Je viens d'Omaha.
I come from Omaha.


See more complex cases in Using 'à' (to/in) and 'de' (from/of) with cities (prepositions) 

See also the more advanced lesson on how to conjugate all six forms of venir in Le Présent:
Conjugate venir, tenir and derivatives in Le Présent (present tense) 

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Je viens de Paris.
I am from Paris.


Je m'appelle Caroline et je viens d'Avignon.
My name is Caroline and I am from Avignon.


Vous venez d'où ?
Where are you from?


Je viens de Londres.
I am from London.


D'où venez-vous ?
Where are you from?


Je viens d'Édimbourg.
I am from Edinburgh.


Tu viens d'où?
Where are you from?


D'où viens-tu?
Where do you come from?


Je viens d'Omaha.
I come from Omaha.


Je viens de Madrid.
I am from Madrid.


Je viens de Hong Kong.
I am from Hong Kong.


Q&A

Nigel

Kwiziq community member

5 December 2018

2 replies

I found the audio of "je viens d'Omaha" very difficult to understand and recognise "Omaha"

Tom

Kwiziq community member

6 December 2018

6/12/18

Hi Nigel,

The audio sounds ok to my ear.

Perhaps you were expecting to hear the "h" sounded in the French version of Omaha?

"H" is always silent in French.

Hope this helps,

Tom

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

7 December 2018

7/12/18

Bonjour Nigel !

I've now replaced the sound file with a clearer one, but as Tom pointed out, the two "a" sounds are very thinly distinct in French because of the non-pronunciation of the "h". It's more like a long [a] sound :)

I hope that's helpful!
Bonne journée !

Catherine

Kwiziq community member

30 October 2018

3 replies

d'ou viens-tu

Anthony

Kwiziq community member

1 November 2018

1/11/18

Je viens de Nairobi

Joshua

Kwiziq community member

12 November 2018

12/11/18

Je viens d'Iringa

robin

Kwiziq community member

2 December 2018

2/12/18

Je viens de Marolles en Hurepoix

Maxine

Kwiziq community member

7 October 2018

1 reply

I don' understand the (d) D' ou what does the (d) mean in a sentence

Chris

Kwiziq community member

8 October 2018

8/10/18

It means "from". 

Où -- where, d'où -- from where. 

Tilen

Kwiziq community member

1 August 2018

1 reply

So if you're speaking of a german city starting with H, does the "de" contract to "d' " or not? Je viens de/d' Hambourg.

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

2 August 2018

2/08/18

Hi Tilen,

I would say, 'de Hambourg' just to make sure that the city is clearly recognised...

Melissa

Kwiziq community member

3 July 2018

2 replies

Je viens de Kansas City. Does Kansas City have a French pronunciation or do I say it the way I would in English?

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

3 July 2018

3/07/18

Yes I think so Melissa, that should be recognisable for the majority of French people, you might have to explain where exactly it is though....

Melissa

Kwiziq community member

3 July 2018

3/07/18

Merci, Cecile.

Elaine

Kwiziq community member

30 May 2018

1 reply

vous venez d'ou?

Chris

Kwiziq community member

30 May 2018

30/05/18

Did you have a question?

Georgia

Kwiziq community member

5 February 2018

3 replies

Comment conjuguez-vous avec il, elle, ils, elles et nous>

Georgia

Kwiziq community member

5 February 2018

5/02/18

Chris

Kwiziq community member

5 February 2018

5/02/18

Hi Georgia,

here is the conjugation of "Je viens de Vienne."

Je viens de Vienne.
Tu viens de Vienne.
Il/elle/on vient de Vienne.

Nous venons de Vienne.
Vous venez de Vienne.
Ils/elles viennent de Vienne.

I hope that's helpful to you.  -- Chris (not a native speaker).

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

16 April 2018

16/04/18

Bonjour Georgia !

Here is the link to our lesson on the full conjugation of venir in Le Présent:

https://progress.lawlessfrench.com/revision/grammar/conjugate-venir-tenir-and-derivatives-in-le-present-present-tense

Bonne journée !

Shivam

Kwiziq community member

15 January 2018

1 reply

Comment vous vous appelez?

Chris

Kwiziq community member

15 January 2018

15/01/18

What's your question? -- Chris.

randolf

Kwiziq community member

20 December 2017

2 replies

je viens de manila.

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

20 December 2017

20/12/17

Bonjour Randolf !

Good sentence, just one thing :

Je viens de Manille.

Bonne journée !

Fred

Kwiziq community member

22 December 2017

22/12/17

je viens d'aux États-Unis

Vernon

Kwiziq community member

3 December 2017

3 replies

Do city names have gender?

According to the lesson below, you have to use de/du depending on a country's gender. Is it the same for cities? https://french.kwiziq.com/my-languages/french/tests/results/1861632/system?quick-lesson-popup=1

Ron

Kwiziq community member

4 December 2017

4/12/17

Bonsoir Vernon, Yes, city names have a gender. which is covered in a different lesson at the A1 level; here is that lesson link: https://progress.lawlessfrench.com/my-languages/french/view/3119 J'espère que ma réponse vous aiderait. Bonne chance et bonne continuation dans vos études en français, la langue de Molière et qui a été utilisée par le monde français depuis l’époque d’Hugues Capet Ron (un locuteur non natif )

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

15 March 2018

15/03/18

Hi Vernon,

Although you don't need to worry about the gender of most towns or cities in the expression , 'Venir de', as in the case of single word places it will always be

Je viens de Paris, je viens de Londres, je viens d'Amsterdam, je viens de Nice ...

In the case of towns which use an article in their name it will be,

je viens du Havre (because the town is Le Havre )

Je viens de La Rochelle ( because the town is La Rochelle)  

je viens des Sables d'Olonne ( the town is Les Sables d'Olonne) etc...

When you start talking about towns and cities or describing them you will need to use a gender and some will be feminine or masculine. Some will have an article in front of them like, La Havane , La RochelleLe Creusot which will determine whether they are feminine or masculine. Some will have an adjective in their name like, Mantes-la-Jolie which will indicate their gender. But in the majority of single word cases, there are no rules to indicate whether a city or town is masculine or feminine except when you use the adjectives 'vieux', 'grand', 'nouveau' or 'tout' in front of  them which  will always be masculine in this case, e.g. Le Vieux Nice, le grand Bruxelles, le nouveau Belleville, Le tout-Paris...

Hope this helps!

 

Desi

Kwiziq community member

18 March 2018

18/03/18

Let me take a look at that...