Standalone adjectives after c'est are always masculine

Look at these 2 contrasting examples:

La jupe coûte 30€. - Cette jupe est chère.
The skirt costs €30. - This skirt is expensive.

La jupe coûte 30€. - C'est cher !
The skirt costs €30. - That's expensive!

- In the first case, the adjective (describing word) chère relates to a specific noun (la jupe) present in the sentence, therefore the regular rule of agreement applies.

- In the second case, we're still talking about the skirt, but commenting on its price in a general context, using c'est (that is), hence the use of the masculine form of the adjective (cher).

When a standalone adjective is used after c'est, it will always be in the masculine form.

Here are more examples:

C'est ennuyeux.
It is boring.

C'est génial !
It's great!

C'est joli.
It is pretty.

C'est gratuit.
It is free.


Also see C'est = It is 

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

C'est génial !
It's great!


La jupe coûte 30€. - C'est cher !
The skirt costs €30. - That's expensive!


C'est gratuit.
It is free.


La jupe coûte 30€. - Cette jupe est chère.
The skirt costs €30. - This skirt is expensive.


C'est ennuyeux.
It is boring.


C'est excitant.
It is exciting.


C'est joli.
It is pretty.



Q&A Forum 6 questions, 9 answers

Est ce que votre robe est chere

Asked 2 months ago
CécileKwiziq language super star

C'est une drôle de question, Mtete...

Est ce que votre robe est chere

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translation

The translation given for "Ta voiture est petite. - Oui, mais c'est petit dans mon garage.""Your car is small. - Yes, but my garage is small."

The second sentence seems like it should be the car that is small in the garage. Is the translation correct?

Asked 3 months ago
CécileKwiziq language super starCorrect answer

Hi Andrew,

If you say -

'C'est petit dans mon garage'

What is actually meant is -

'There isn't much room in my garage' 

Hope this helps!

 

Perhaps an alternate translation could've been provided in addition to the one given, so that the context of the excercise was clear.

Otherwise, one might come up with (such as I did, and admittedly missing the point of the excercise): "Oui, mais c'est grand dans mon garage." ... pointing out that a car of such small size would actually appear big in a garage that's just as small.

From "C'est petit dans mon garage," I get the impression that it should be: "Your car is so small. - Yes, it's small even in my garage (which, by the way, doesn't have much room to begin with)."

translation

The translation given for "Ta voiture est petite. - Oui, mais c'est petit dans mon garage.""Your car is small. - Yes, but my garage is small."

The second sentence seems like it should be the car that is small in the garage. Is the translation correct?

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C'est x Elle est

In the sentence "She's a French actress", supposing I'm pointing out to a picture of the actress in my hand or the actress is standing herself by my side, presenting her to others, in these cases, can I say "Elle est une actrice française" ? Or even though it remains "C'est une actrice française" ?

Asked 4 months ago
CécileKwiziq language super starCorrect answer

Hi Marcio,

You can say;-

Elle est actrice” 

Or 

Elle est française” 

But 

“C’est une actrice française” is the only correct sentence...

You cannot say ‘Il est un...’

Elle est une ...’ in French 

C'est x Elle est

In the sentence "She's a French actress", supposing I'm pointing out to a picture of the actress in my hand or the actress is standing herself by my side, presenting her to others, in these cases, can I say "Elle est une actrice française" ? Or even though it remains "C'est une actrice française" ?

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Why de grands hommes and not des grands hommes..?

Asked 9 years ago
RonC1Correct answer
Bonjour Gloria,
Here is the lesson that addresses this exact scenario:
https://progress.lawlessfrench.com/revision/grammar/use-de-d-instead-of-des-in-front-of-adjectives-preceding-nouns-partitive-article

In short, des is the contracted version of de + les .
Bonne chance.

Why de grands hommes and not des grands hommes..?

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Uses of C'est

Hello, I am a bit confused about the standalone adject + c'est constructions. I thought that to use c'est it needed to proceed a noun within the sentence. Is what I'm seeing here a special case? Or do I have it completely mixed up (which wouldn't come as a great shock to me lol)?
Asked 10 years ago
Disregard my question. I just discovered the answer. :)
Here's the lesson you might be looking fir! https://progress.lawlessfrench.com/my-languages/french/view/733?rts=%252Fsearch%253Fs%253DC%252527est
Merci beaucoup!

Uses of C'est

Hello, I am a bit confused about the standalone adject + c'est constructions. I thought that to use c'est it needed to proceed a noun within the sentence. Is what I'm seeing here a special case? Or do I have it completely mixed up (which wouldn't come as a great shock to me lol)?

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DanielA2

...not for the day of Luuuurve

what's a luuuurve? Did you mean love?
Asked 0 years ago
RonC1
pas pour le jour de l'Amoooouuuur! That seems like a possible error or une blague. Read, le jour de l'Amour.

...not for the day of Luuuurve

what's a luuuurve? Did you mean love?

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