Conjugate être in Le Futur (future tense)

The verb être in Futur Simple has an irregular stem : ser-

je

serai

tu

seras

il / elle / on     

sera

nous

serons  

vous

serez

ils/elles

seront

To conjugate the irregular verb être (to be) in Futur Simple, you use:

ser- + the following endings: -ai, -as, -a, -ons, -ez, -ont

Look at these examples:

Je serai bientôt mariée.
I will be married soon.

Tu seras déçue, crois-moi!
You will be disappointed, believe me!

Cette guitare sera à moi.
This guitar will be mine.

Nous serons bientôt là.
We will be there soon.

Vous serez à l'école.
You will be at school.

Ils seront gentils.
They will be nice.


Not to get mixed up with the root of savoir = saur- 
See Conjugate savoir in Le Futur (future tense)

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Je serai bientôt mariée.
I will be married soon.


Ils seront gentils.
They will be nice.


Vous serez à l'école.
You will be at school.


Nous serons bientôt là.
We will be there soon.


Cette guitare sera à moi.
This guitar will be mine.


Tu seras déçue, crois-moi!
You will be disappointed, believe me!



Q&A Forum 6 questions, 11 answers

LouiseC1Kwiziq community member

I wrote serons because "on" referred to

Asked 1 year ago
ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor Correct answer

Hi Louise,

I am guessing at what your question might be because your post didn't show one....

On sera à la fête ce soir. -- We will be at the party tonight.
Nous serons à la fête ce soir. -- We will be at the party tonight.

Both sentences mean the same thing. The first version, with "on" is a bit more colloquial than the one using "nous", though. Note that the verb has to fit the subject in person and number. Since "on" is third person singular, that's what you need for the verb: sera. When using "nous" as the verb, you need first person plural, hence "serons".

-- Chris (not a native speaker).

AurélieKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Bonjour Louise !

To complete Chris's answer, here's the link to our lesson on "on" : 

https://progress.lawlessfrench.com/revision/grammar/on-can-mean-we-one-and-people

Bonne journée !

I wrote serons because "on" referred to

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JasonC1Kwiziq community member

No article after futur simple

What's the rule with articles after the future simple? (Why is it 'il sera docteur' and not 'il sera un docteur')
Asked 2 years ago
AurélieKwiziq team member
Bonjour Jason ! The absence of article here is not linked to Le Futur Simple, but to talking about professions. Have a look at the following lesson: Don't use un, une when stating people's professions (zero article) À bientôt !
JasonC1Kwiziq community member
Thanks Aurélie!

No article after futur simple

What's the rule with articles after the future simple? (Why is it 'il sera docteur' and not 'il sera un docteur')

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AurélieKwiziq team member

Why can't I say "Ma copine et moi *nous* serons..." ?

Asked 2 years ago
AurélieKwiziq team member
​Actually, here the rule is the same as in English: ​though in spoken French, a lot of people would "double" the compound subject by adding its equivalent subject pronoun (Marie et moi, nous.... / Ta mère et toi, vous... etc), this is a redundant and incorrect turn of phrase, and it is to be avoided in written form.

Why can't I say "Ma copine et moi *nous* serons..." ?

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Susan C1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

A bit of a digression re déçue: how is it that décevoir means disappoint,

but seems to come from the same root as deceive?
Asked 3 years ago
AurélieKwiziq team member
Bonjour Susan ! That's an interesting remark :) I guess the two meanings are not that far from each other: after all you would be disappointed if someone deceived you. I guess that's probably the link between the two meanings! Note that in French we also have "désappointé" and "désappointement", they're just not common and considered quite old-fashioned and quaint. À bientôt !
Susan C1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor
The linkage you point to may be an example of French as the language of diplomacy - "We were disappointed" sounds far more moderate than, "We were deceived." Or maybe not. Thanks for your reply, Aurélie.

A bit of a digression re déçue: how is it that décevoir means disappoint,

but seems to come from the same root as deceive?

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MelodyB2Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

What does "irregular remote" mean?

Asked 3 years ago
LauraKwiziq team member
Hi Melody, Sorry, that's a typo, it should say "root." We'll get it fixed soon.
AurélieKwiziq team member
Thank you for reporting this mistake, Melody, it's now been fixed! À bientôt !

What does "irregular remote" mean?

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OliviaB1Kwiziq community member

How do you know when to use the future simple versus aller+ infinitive?

Asked 3 years ago
AurélieKwiziq team member
Bonjour Olivia ! In most cases, you will use Le Futur (futur simple) to express "I will + verb", whereas Le Futur Proche (aller + infinitive) is the equivalent of "I'm going to + verb". A bientôt !
LolliB1Kwiziq community member
This is a rather old thread, but when I was in school (many, many years ago) I do not remember any distinction between a futur simple and a futur proche (which in fact I have never heard of). Is this something new? I learned that aller + inf was always correct and an easy way to create a future tense.

How do you know when to use the future simple versus aller+ infinitive?

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