Conjugate avoir in Le Présent (present tense)

The verb avoir (to have) is irregular (it doesn't follow the same conjugation rules as other verbs ending in -oir).

It conjugates like this in Le Présent:

j' ai
tu as
il/elle/on  a
nous avons
vous avez
ils/elles ont


Have a listen to these examples:

J'ai un chien.
I have a dog.

Tu as une sœur.
You have a sister.

Il a les yeux bleus.
He has blue eyes.

Nous avons deux chats.
We have two cats.

Vous avez les mêmes yeux.
You have the same eyes.

Ils ont un bébé.
They have a baby.

 

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Vous avez les mêmes yeux.
You have the same eyes.


Nous avons deux chats.
We have two cats.


Tu as une sœur.
You have a sister.


Elle a une souris.
She has a mouse.



Il a les yeux bleus.
He has blue eyes.


Ils ont un bébé.
They have a baby.


J'ai un chien.
I have a dog.


Q&A Forum 13 questions, 23 answers

rendez vous

Why does J'ai rendez-vous not have an article

Asked 1 month ago
CécileKwiziq language super starCorrect answer

Hi Peggie, 

As Tom rightly said :

Avoir (un) rendez-vous is to have an appointment

with or without the article.

It is the same for, to make an appointment -

Prendre (un) rendez-vous 

Je vais prendre (un) rendez-vous chez le coiffeurI am going to make an appointment at the hairdresser's 

Hope this helps!

TomC1

Hi Peggie,

It is possible to use an article with "rendez-vous"

(i) J'ai un rendez-vous (chez, à, avec etc)

(ii) J'ai rendez-vous (chez, à, avec etc)

The only difference that I can think of between them is that (i) can stand alone - J'ai un rendez-vous. whereas (ii) might require qualification  J'ai rendez-vous chez le médicin

Perhaps a native speaker could elaborate.

rendez vous

Why does J'ai rendez-vous not have an article

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Bonjour tout le monde

Asked 4 months ago
CécileKwiziq language super starCorrect answer

Salut!

Bonjour tout le monde

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Est ce que cette classe est A-1?

Asked 4 months ago
ChrisC1Correct answer

Yes. Why do you ask?

Est ce que cette classe est A-1?

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Que est qu’il dit?

Que est qu’il voudrait saviors?

Asked 7 months ago
CécileKwiziq language super star

Sorry John, what is your question?

Que est qu’il dit?

Que est qu’il voudrait saviors?

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avons nous plusieurs appartments?

Asked 8 months ago
CécileKwiziq language super star

Hi William,

Do you have a question?

avons nous plusieurs appartments?

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Kelly A1

Demonstrative

Asked 1 year ago

You need to form comprehensible questions. I don't know what you're asking. 

-- Chris. 

Kelly asked:View original

Demonstrative

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Bonjour.

Which conjugated verb will a proper noun take? How about common nouns? Is there any difference in singularity and plurality of the verbs as in English?
Asked 2 years ago
RonC1
Bonjour Kyaw, a proper noun, i.e. a person's name, will use the third person singular. Let's look at some examples: J'ai un chien. I have a dog. So if we want to state that Jean has a dog, then the phrase becomes «Jean a un chien» Nous avons deux chats. We have two cats. In speaking about my family, to use a common noun, Ma famille a deux chats or Nous avons deux chats. or how about «the house has a roof» la maison a un toit. Elle a une souris. She has a mouse. In these examples, except for nous, they all use the third person singular. With nous it takes the first person plural, nous avons. I hope this helps, Bonne chance, Ron
Merci prof. It helps. So if the subject is plural proper nouns such as John et Alice or plural common nouns such as La maisons, which verbs can we use to be compatable with.
Do they use third person plural?

Bonjour.

Which conjugated verb will a proper noun take? How about common nouns? Is there any difference in singularity and plurality of the verbs as in English?

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Bonjour. Also, do I have body parts or own them?

Asked 2 years ago
AurélieKwiziq language super star
Bonjour Candace ! Well, in French, you will use "avoir [un bras / une bouche / ... ]", and in English I would use "to have" as well. Does this answer your question?
Oui. Merci.
MaxA0
Bonsoir! That's interesting, Aurélie. I'm Brazilian, and in Portuguese (which also comes from latin) we have a similar construction. We can say "nós" (= French's "nous") which takes a plural verb, or we can say "a gente", which has the same meaning as "nós", but takes a singular verb, just as "on" does in French.

Bonjour. Also, do I have body parts or own them?

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Bonjour. Is it possible to use On? Would I conjugate on a or on avons? Merci.

Asked 2 years ago
AurélieKwiziq language super star
Bonjour Candace ! Yes, of course, "on" is actually more common in speech than "nous". You conjugate verbs with it as you do "il/elle", so it will be "on a". I hope that's helpful! À bientôt !
La réponse m'aide. Merci.

Bonjour. Is it possible to use On? Would I conjugate on a or on avons? Merci.

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Bonjour! Nous avons deux chiens et un cheval. :)

Asked 2 years ago
AurélieKwiziq language super star
C'est super ! Moi, je n'ai pas d'animal familier.
Pourquoi vous n'avez pas d'animal familier? :)
AurélieKwiziq language super star
J'habite dans un petit appartement en plein centre-ville, et pour être honnête, je n'ai pas vraiment envie :)

Bonjour! Nous avons deux chiens et un cheval. :)

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J'ai une chienne

Asked 3 years ago
AurélieKwiziq language super star
Super Amany ! Comment s'appelle-t-elle ?

J'ai une chienne

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T'as

Actually I saw people using 't'as' in sitcoms, and I guessed it should be 'tu as'. Do we get to use that once we are more advanced? It's an informal expression, right?
Asked 3 years ago
AurélieKwiziq language super star
Bonjour Charles ! That's an interesting question: indeed, "t'as" is the contraction of "tu as" (you have), just like "t'es" is the contraction of "tu es" (you are). It's extremely commonly used in speech: I mean, everyone says "t'as" and "t'es"! However, unlike in English where "you're" or "I'm" are perfectly acceptable written forms, in French you are not supposed to write the contracted forms, only "tu as" or "tu es". I hope that answers your question!

T'as

Actually I saw people using 't'as' in sitcoms, and I guessed it should be 'tu as'. Do we get to use that once we are more advanced? It's an informal expression, right?

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Why do you contract je ai to j'ai but leave tu as and not t'as ?

It seems like tu never contracts with the following verb. Are there other words that end in vowels but never contract with the next word ?
Asked 3 years ago
Is it perhaps because the French u followed by a doesn't have a glottal stop in the same way that French e followed by a has?
LauraKwiziq language super star

Bonjour Lisa,

In grammatically correct French, E is the only vowel that contracts. So je, me, te, le, etc all contract, but tu, qui, etc do not.

The only exceptions are la and si, but the latter only when it means "if" and only in front of il and ils.

Oh, that is interesting. I don't think I've seen that pointed out anywhere. Merci.

Why do you contract je ai to j'ai but leave tu as and not t'as ?

It seems like tu never contracts with the following verb. Are there other words that end in vowels but never contract with the next word ?

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