Conjugate partir, sortir and other -tir verbs in Le Présent (present tense)

The verb partir (to leave), as other -TIR verbs*, is irregular in Le Présent , in the sense that it doesn't follow the regular -IR conjugation:

je pars I leave
tu pars You leave (one person you know well)
il/elle/on part He/she/one leaves - we/people leave
nous partons We leave
vous partez You leave (more than 1 person or formal)
ils/elles partent They leave


Have a listen to more examples:

Je pars en vacances demain.
I'm going on holiday tomorrow.

À quelle heure est-ce que tu pars au travail ?
What time do you leave for work?

Elle part de chez elle.
She's leaving her house.

Le samedi, nous partons vers 17h.
On Saturdays, we leave around 5pm.

Où partez-vous cette année ?
Where are you going this year?

Les invités partent tous en même temps.
The guests are all leaving at the same time.


*Other irregular verbs ending in -TIR follow the same conjugation pattern: 

sortir (to go out)
ressortir (to go out again)
sentir
 (to smell)
se sentir (to feel)
mentir (to lie)
repartir (to leave again)


The verb répartir (to distribute) is NOT a derivative of partir, but shares its root with the word "repartition", and follows the regular -IR conjugation (see Conjugate regular -ir verbs in Le Présent (present tense)).


Here are more examples:

Je sors aujourd'hui.
I'm going out today.

Tu te sens bien ?
Are you feeling O.K.?

Éric ressort plus tard.
Éric is going out again later.

Nous te mentons.
We are lying to you.

Vous repartez déjà ?
Are you going back already?

Ils sentent mauvais.
They smell bad.

 
See also the irregular -IR verb courir:
Conjugate courir in Le Présent (present tense)

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Vous repartez déjà ?
Are you going back already?


Je sors aujourd'hui.
I'm going out today.


Elle part de chez elle.
She's leaving her house.


Tu te sens bien ?
Are you feeling O.K.?


Les invités partent tous en même temps.
The guests are all leaving at the same time.


Nous te mentons.
We are lying to you.


Je pars en vacances demain.
I'm going on holiday tomorrow.



Où partez-vous cette année ?
Where are you going this year?


Éric ressort plus tard.
Éric is going out again later.



Le samedi, nous partons vers 17h.
On Saturdays, we leave around 5pm.


Nous sortons ce soir.
We are going out tonight.


Ils sentent mauvais.
They smell bad.


À quelle heure est-ce que tu pars au travail ?
What time do you leave for work?


Q&A Forum 6 questions, 13 answers

SwastikA1Kwiziq community member

Mens vs Ment

Mon nez s'allonge quand je ________.My nose grows when I lie.What should be the answer here? I wrote ment while the system show mens.Can you pls clarify this?Thanks.
Asked 2 months ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Swastik,

The point of this lesson was to learn to conjugate a verb like 'mentir'  ( to lie).

If you look at the examples given you have to agree the 'je' form with the correct part of the verb which is 'mens'.

I know it is tedious but conjugations are an integral part of learning how to use verbs correctly in all Latin based languages including French.

Bonne Continuation!

 

AaronC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

It's "mens". You can look up conjugation on Wiktionary and other websites.

Mens vs Ment

Mon nez s'allonge quand je ________.My nose grows when I lie.What should be the answer here? I wrote ment while the system show mens.Can you pls clarify this?Thanks.

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ClaudiaA1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Salut a tous

Ressortir  and repartir  

Could they be considered synonyms?

Asked 5 months ago
MarieKwiziq team member

Hi Claudia,

Although "ressortir" and "repartir" can have similar meanings, they are not exactly synonyms, and there is a subtle difference.

"Ressortir": to go out again (implying that you are going out of a specific place)

For example: Je ressort acheter du café (I' m going out again to buy coffee

"Repartir": to get going again, to set off again (implying that one was in movement, stopped, and is going again), OR, to leave a place to go back where we're from.

For example: Après une pause, il est reparti (After a break, he got going again) 
Tu repars déjà chez toi? (Are you going home already?)

I hope this helps!

Salut a tous

Ressortir  and repartir  

Could they be considered synonyms?

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JoanA1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

'je me sens de la joie' and 'je sens la joie'. Are they the same?

Asked 6 months ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Joan,

I will try to explain the different uses of sentir, se sentir et ressentir -

'Sentir' conveys a physical sensation usually attached to the senses of touch and smell.

Ça sent bon le pain There's a lovely smell of bread

Je sentais son corps contre le mien = I felt his body against mine

Il sent mauvais = He smells awful

and also in a figurative sense -

On commnence à sentir les effets de la crise économique = We are beginning to feel the effects of the financial crisis

But it is always something tangible.

'Se sentir' is used to convey how you 'feel' -

Je me sens malade , fatiguée , triste... I feel ill, tired, sad ...

Il se sentait mal à l'aise devant elle = He felt ill at ease in front of her

Vous vous sentez fatigué? = Do you feel tired?

Se sentir will be followed by an adjective or an adverb.

'Ressentir' will be followed by strong emotions in noun forms.

Ressentir de la haine ( hatred) , de la honte ( shame), de l'amour ( love)  de la joie ( joy) etc...

Hope this helps!

 

JoanA1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

I missed out 'de' in the second sentence. It should be:

 'je me sens de la joie' and 'je sens de la joie'. Are they the same?

CécileKwiziq team member

Hi Joan,

'Je me sens de la joie' is incorrect but can you give me the context of the other sentence please as 'je ressens de la joie' is more appropriate...

JoanA1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Thank you Cécile. 

The reason we use 'ressentir + de la joie' is that they are fixed collocation or that there is subtle difference between 'ressentir' and 'sentir'? (What is their difference?)

JoanA1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor
Merci beaucoup, Cécile. It is clear to me now. 

'je me sens de la joie' and 'je sens la joie'. Are they the same?

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JohnA1Kwiziq community member

Am uncertain. Are you saying that repartir has repartons, or repartissons? You appear to contradict yourself (so I presumably am misunderstanding

Asked 7 months ago
JohnA1Kwiziq community member

Sorry. I missed below. JOhn.

Am uncertain. Are you saying that repartir has repartons, or repartissons? You appear to contradict yourself (so I presumably am misunderstanding

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SueC1Kwiziq community member

Is « I smell sweat » and « I smell of sweat » both «  Je sens de transpiration »?

Asked 1 year ago
ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Je sens la transpiration. -- I smell of sweat. AND I smell sweat.

-- Chris (not a native speaker).

Is « I smell sweat » and « I smell of sweat » both «  Je sens de transpiration »?

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WandaA2Kwiziq community member

I'm confused about répartir.. shouldn't it be répartissez

Asked 2 years ago
RonC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor
Bonjour Wanda, Here is the TIP from the lesson above that concerns répartir: The verb répartir (to distribute) is NOT a derivative of partir, but shares its root with the word "repartition", and follows the regular -IR conjugation (see Conjugate regular -ir verbs in Le Présent (present tense)). It should not be confused with this verb: «repartir (to leave again)», no «-é» which gives a different meaning and different conjugation: repartir (to leave again) je repars tu repars il repart nous repartons vous repartez ils repartent répartir (to distribute) Je répartis Tu répartis Il/elle répartit Nous répartissons Vous répartissez Ils/elles répartissent J'espère que ma réponse vous aiderait. Bonne chance et bonne continuation dans vos études en français, la langue de Molière et qui a été utilisé par le monde français depuis l’époque d’Hugues Capet Ron (also a non-native speaker)
WandaA2Kwiziq community member
merci, je comprends.
DianeA2Kwiziq community member

I struggled with this also. Could be clearer that  either spelling is correct depending on the meaning of the word. Répartir to leave again (conjugates like irregular partir), but Répartir (to redistribute) regular, like finir.  Is that right, chef?

.

I'm confused about répartir.. shouldn't it be répartissez

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