Conjugate venir, tenir and derivatives in Le Présent (present tense)

The verbs venir (to come), tenir (to hold/keep) and derivatives* are irregular in Le Présent, meaning that they don't follow the same pattern as regular -ir verbs.

Here are venir and tenir in Présent indicatif:

Présent indicatif
je viens
tu viens
il vient
elle vient
on vient
nous venons
vous venez
ils viennent
elles viennent

Présent indicatif
je tiens
tu tiens
il tient
elle tient
on tient
nous tenons
vous tenez
ils tiennent
elles tiennent


*These other verbs ending in -enir follow the same conjugation pattern: 

revenir (to come back)
devenir (to become)
parvenir (to manage / to achieve)
convenir (to agree / to suit)

retenir (to retain / to hold back)
appartenir (to belong)
obtenir (to obtain)
contenir (to contain)
soutenir (to support)
etc


Have a listen to these examples:

Je reviens dans une minute !
I'm coming back in a minute!

Tu tiens toujours tes promesses.
You always keep your promises.

Mon prof de français vient de Chartres.
My French teacher comes from Chartres.

Nous soutenons sa candidature.
We support his application.

Vous appartenez à ce club.
You belong to this club.

Ils deviennent de plus en plus grands.
They're becoming taller and taller.

 

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Nous venons d'Argentine.
We come from Argentina.


Nous soutenons sa candidature.
We support his application.


Quand est-ce que vous venez chez nous ? 
When are you coming to our place?


Ils tiennent la main de leur maman.
They hold their mum's hand.


Tu tiens toujours tes promesses.
You always keep your promises.


Mon prof de français vient de Chartres.
My French teacher comes from Chartres.


D'où vient-il?
Where does he come from?


Je reviens dans une minute !
I'm coming back in a minute!



Ils deviennent de plus en plus grands.
They're becoming taller and taller.


Tu viens avec moi?
Are you coming with me?


Je viens de voir Isabelle.
I've just seen Isabelle.



Vous appartenez à ce club.
You belong to this club.


Maria et Pablo viennent de Madrid.
Maria and Pablo come from Madrid.


Q&A Forum 11 questions, 17 answers

MaryA1

These tests are sometimes quite frustrating because I click the correct answer but it changes when I hit enter. It happened on this test with devenons

It was marked wrong and shown as the wrong answer. So my score went down.

Asked 4 months ago
ChrisC1Correct answer

I think you should post that problem under the Help & Support menu.

Mary asked:View original

These tests are sometimes quite frustrating because I click the correct answer but it changes when I hit enter. It happened on this test with devenons

It was marked wrong and shown as the wrong answer. So my score went down.

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Does Viens mean just as well as Come

Asked 1 year ago

Possibly you are thinking of the "Le Passé Proche" using venir de + infinitive e.g. 

"Je viens de finir mon livre" - "I've just finished my book"

It's explained here:

Venir de + infinitive = To have just done (Le Passé Proche)

CécileKwiziq language super star

Hi Alison,

Do you mean:"Viens ici!" ("Come here!")

which is the imperative form of venir?

Oui
'Vient' means 'come'. 'Vient de' means 'have just come'. In the latter case you must follow 'have just come' by the infinitive.

Does Viens mean just as well as Come

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Whats indicatif in simple English?

Asked 1 year ago
CécileKwiziq language super starCorrect answer

Hi Carolyne,

Mode Indicatif is indicative mood in English grammar and describes a collection of tenses describing facts that are happening, have happened or will happen in the present, past and future.

What  this lesson illustrates is the present tense which we use most often of things you do, (or are doing) using some irregular verbs which conjugate in their particular way and being used in the present tense of the indicative (mood).

In  time you will learn different present tenses of different moods and this is to distinguish them from each other.

The indicative is the realm of certainty and facts.

I have tried to simplify as much as possible.

Hope this helps! 

Whats indicatif in simple English?

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The 3rd person in the plural form of the verb “ parvenir “ is “ils parvent ?”

Asked 1 year ago
CécileKwiziq language super starCorrect answer

Hi Thekla, 

it is conjugated like "venir " so it is,

ils  parviennent .

The 3rd person in the plural form of the verb “ parvenir “ is “ils parvent ?”

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Hi. Comfused as a newbe .. why is it la situation devient instead of deviens

Asked 1 year ago
ChrisC1Correct answer

Hi Sara, it is "devient" because in a sentence like "la situation devient..." the subject is in third person singular (he/she/it) and the third person singular of the verb "devenir" is "devient".

Incidentally, to check any verb conjugation, you might find this site helpful: http://conjugator.reverso.net/conjugation-french-verb-devenir.html

For "devenir" in present tense indicative it goes like this:

je deviens,
tu deviens,
il/elle/on devient,
nous devenons
vous devenez,
ils/elles deviennent

I hope that helps a bit.

-- Chris (not a native speaker).

Fabulous. Thankyou.

Hi. Comfused as a newbe .. why is it la situation devient instead of deviens

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Should et be used instead of en?

In the sentence below, it is indicating taller and taller. Why is en used -- plus en plus? Should it be plus et plus? Ils deviennent de plus en plus grands
Asked 1 year ago
RonC1Correct answer
Bonjour Ashwini,

https://progress.lawlessfrench.com/my-languages/french/view/5012

The link above is the lesson that explains the use of «de. . . en. . .». This is an invariable phrase structure in French which is used for English phrases like: bigger and bigger, better and better, more and more, etc. I hope this is useful. bonne chance

Should et be used instead of en?

In the sentence below, it is indicating taller and taller. Why is en used -- plus en plus? Should it be plus et plus? Ils deviennent de plus en plus grands

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JimA1

Isn't this wrong? Shouldn't be "I am coming to see Martine." Or "I come to see Martine?"

Je viens de voir Martine. I've just seen Martine. <- Past tense???
Asked 2 years ago
AurélieKwiziq language super star
Bonjour Jim ! No, this sentence is correct here. Indeed, to express what we call the Close Past or "Passé Proche" in French, you use "venir de + infinitive" in Le Présent. Have a look at our related lesson: Venir de + infinitive = To have just done (Le Passé Proche) I hope that's helpful! À bientôt !

Isn't this wrong? Shouldn't be "I am coming to see Martine." Or "I come to see Martine?"

Je viens de voir Martine. I've just seen Martine. <- Past tense???

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Quand vient le autobus?

Asked 2 years ago
AurélieKwiziq language super star
Bonjour Marilyn ! "Quand vient/arrive l'autobus ?" is not incorrect, but nowadays, you would more commonly use "le bus" :) Here are options of questions: "Quand est-ce que le bus arrive ?" "Le bus arrive quand ?" I hope that's helpful! Bonne Année !

Quand vient le autobus?

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Viennent ( ils viennent ) is pronounced the same as viens and vient? Ignore the " ent " ending?

Asked 2 years ago
AurélieKwiziq language super star
Bonjour Gary ! No, "viennent" is pronounced [V-N] because of the double "n". Thanks to your question, I've now added audio examples to this lesson, so you can listen to the difference yourself :) I hope that's helpful! À bientôt !
Merci Aurélie.

Viennent ( ils viennent ) is pronounced the same as viens and vient? Ignore the " ent " ending?

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so basically anything ending with "enir" is conjugated like venir ?

Asked 2 years ago
LauraKwiziq language super star
In the present tense, yes. In the compound tenses, some verbs ending in -enir use avoir as the auxiliary while others use être.

so basically anything ending with "enir" is conjugated like venir ?

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LynA2

What is the perfect tense

Asked 3 years ago
LauraKwiziq language super star
Bonjour Lyn, There isn't one perfect tense - "perfect" describes several tenses: present perfect, past perfect, future perfect, etc. Grammatically, it means "complete" in contrast to the imperfect which is incomplete.
KimA2
The past perfect is sometimes referred to as the perfect tense, I think in contrast to another past tense known as imparfait, imperfect. The past perfect is also known as le passé composé.

What is the perfect tense

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