Conjugate vouloir in Le Subjonctif Présent (subjunctive mood)

The verb VOULOIR is irregular in the Subjonctif Présent:

 
que je veuille I want
que tu veuilles you want
qu'il/elle/on veuille he/she/we want
que nous voulions we want
que vous vouliez you want
qu'ils/elles veuillent they want
 

Note that the nous and vous forms are the same as in L'Imparfait. (See Conjugate regular verbs in L'Imparfait (imperfect tense))

As for the other forms, the irregular root veuill- is followed by the regular endings of Le Subjonctif Présent: 

-e, -es, -e, [-], [-], -ent

 
 
Have a look at these examples:
 

Ils n'arrivent pas à croire que je veuille rester !
They can't believe that I want to stay!

 

C'est comme ça, que tu le veuilles ou pas.
It's this way, whether you want it or not.

 

Il faut déjà qu'il veuille bien m'aider.
He has to be willing to help me to start with.

 

Il ne croit pas que nous lui voulions du mal.
He doesn't believe we want to hurt him.

 

Que doit-il faire pour que vous vouliez sortir avec lui ?
What does he have to do for you to want to go out with him?

 

Je doute qu'ils veuillent venir.
I doubt they want to come.

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Il faut déjà qu'il veuille bien m'aider.
He has to be willing to help me to start with.


Ils n'arrivent pas à croire que je veuille rester !
They can't believe that I want to stay!


C'est comme ça, que tu le veuilles ou pas.
It's this way, whether you want it or not.


Que doit-il faire pour que vous vouliez sortir avec lui ?
What does he have to do for you to want to go out with him?


Je doute qu'ils veuillent venir.
I doubt they want to come.


Il ne croit pas que nous lui voulions du mal.
He doesn't believe we want to hurt him.


Q&A

Marnie

Kwiziq community member

30 October 2018

1 reply

Il faut que...

"il faut déjà qu'il veuille bien m'aider."  Is the use of déjà necessary?  I see that it adds emphasis to the fact that "he" really wants to help but can one do without it?  Just Curious!

Steve

Kwiziq community member

4 November 2018

4/11/18

Marnie,

I don't think it can be omitted without changing the meaning slightly.

The lesson translates the original phrase as:

"He has to be willing to help me to start with."

Déjà is emphasizing the "to start with" part of the phrase.

Without déjà, I would translate it as:

"He has to be willing to help me."

[non-native speaker].

Donald

Kwiziq community member

11 August 2017

3 replies

What drives this sentence to be in the subjunctive tense?

Ron

Kwiziq community member

12 August 2017

12/08/17

Bonjour Donald, I looked at the lesson referenced above and was unable to locate the sentence you mentioned. Is there a specific phrase that you had in mind? I too am curious at times when I read a phrase in French to know what drives the verb tense other than the French grammar rules. I am quite intrigued with your question and look forward to a knowledgeable reply from the Kwiziq team. There must be some underlying rationale, other than just the rules, as to the reasons the subjunctive is used. Bonne chance, Ron

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

23 August 2017

23/08/17

Bonjour Donald ! Unfortunately, I'm unable to see the sentence you're referring to. When using the Q&A, always copy and paste the specific French you refer to, and I'll be happy to clarify things for you :) À bientôt !

Donald

Kwiziq community member

23 August 2017

23/08/17

Je suis désolé. En ce moment, je ne peux pas le trouver. Quand je le trouverai, je vous l'enverrai. Merci d'avoir essayé m'aider. Je ne veux pas vous gaspiller votre temps. Peut-être c'est une autre question- ca veut-dire, l'usage de au lieu d'un autre verbe.

Janice

Kwiziq community member

14 January 2017

2 replies

Vouliez vs. veuilliez

When I read signs etc. that seem to use the subjunctive they use "que vous veuilliez" What am I missing? :-)

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

16 January 2017

16/01/17

Bonjour Janice ! The form that you see on signs (veuillez, not veuilliez) - and that indeed looks similar to Le Subjonctif Présent - is actually L'Impératif Présent, used to express commands and advice. The difference is that with L'Impératif you don't express the verb's subject ([vous] Veuillez), and of course that Le Subjonctif Présent form with "vous" would be "vous vouliez". In French, you'll use "Veuillez + infinitif" as a formal polite way to ask someone to do something: "Veuillez ouvrir votre cahier." (Please open your notebook.) "Veuillez m'excuser" (Please do excuse me) I hope that's helpful! À bientôt !

Janice

Kwiziq community member

17 January 2017

17/01/17

Hello, yes that is great thank you Aurélie. I was definitely confused by that difference on signs! What also confused me though was when I tried to look vouloir up on the Figaro conjugasion site there seemed to be two forms of conjugasions?! What are the 1ere and 2eme forme of a verb? Not all of the forms of vouloir change... http://leconjugueur.lefigaro.fr/conjugaison/verbe/vouloir.html Thank you :-)
Let me take a look at that...