Pour avoir fait = Cause for doing (simple expression)

In French, if you're using pour + Infinitif passé (e.g. avoir fait), you can only be talking about an action that's in the past. Therefore, you could never say pour faire ça for something that has been done, the way you say for doing that in English! 

Look at these examples:

Tu auras une médaille pour avoir sauvé ce pauvre chat.
You'll get a medal for having saved that poor cat.

Nous avons été punis pour avoir menti au prof.
We were punished for having lied to the teacher.

Pour l'avoir connu depuis longtemps, je trouve son comportement troublant.
As I've known him for a long time, I find his behaviour troubling.

[This last example literally means For having known him for a long time, ... This causal pour - giving a reason or cause - is more common in French and can often be translated into English using causal expressions using because, as or since and repeating the subject of the main clause.] 

 

Note that to express for + -ing (or for having + past participle) in French, you use the same following structure:

pour + infinitive of auxiliary (être or avoir) + past participle

ATTENTION: Use the same auxiliary as in compound tenses like Le Passé Composé.

Note that when using avoir preceded by an object pronoun (e.g. pour l'avoir aidé/e), you need to agree the past participle with the object referred to by the object pronoun!

Tu es récompensé pour l'avoir aidée.
You are being rewarded for helping her.

See also the more complex cases: Pour être allé = Cause for going (complex expression) 

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Pour l'avoir connu depuis longtemps, je trouve son comportement troublant.
As I've known him for a long time, I find his behaviour troubling.


Tu auras une médaille pour avoir sauvé ce pauvre chat.
You'll get a medal for having saved that poor cat.


Nous avons été punis pour avoir menti au prof.
We were punished for having lied to the teacher.


Tu es récompensé pour l'avoir aidée.
You are being rewarded for helping her.


Q&A

lynn

Kwiziq community member

30 October 2018

0 replies

I was going on to the 2nd question in the quiz and got booted to the results and now I can't get back to it. Qu'est-ce qu'on doit faire?

CrystalMaiden

Kwiziq community member

17 May 2018

1 reply

Where's the " being? " Why do they exclude étant in this sentence?

Tu es récompensé pour l'avoir aidée.
You are being rewarded for helping her.

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

18 May 2018

18/05/18

Hi CrystalMaiden,

It is just the way it is in French,

For having done something becomes pour avoir fait quelque chose. You use the past infinitive , in this case 'avoir' as faire  uses avoir.

It is the same after the preposition de as in the following examples-

Merci de m'avoir prévenue (Thank you for letting me know in advance)

Merci d'être resté après le discours (Thank you for staying after the talk)

Je suis heureux d'avoir fait votre connaissance (I am happy for meeting you/ to have met you/ to meet you

Hope this helps!

 

Elaine

Kwiziq community member

25 January 2018

2 replies

Pour + infin + pp only is in past tense??

From reading the explanation above it explains that you can only use pour + infinitive and pp when the action is in the past or have I misunderstood? In the example given it says : Tu auras une médaille pour avoir sauvé ce pauvre chat. You'll get a medal for saving that poor cat. Would it not be for having saved that poor cat?? Thanks in advance!

Chris

Kwiziq community member

26 January 2018

26/01/18

I agree that "...for having savid the cat" is the better translation. -- Chris (not a native speaker).

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

29 January 2018

29/01/18

Bonjour Elaine ! I agree with you, but I'd noticed that in English you will sometimes use "for saving" when referring to past actions, in a way that you cannot in French, as mentioned in the lesson. But I'm all for being grammatically accurate :) The example has now been fixed. Merci et à bientôt !

Johnny

Kwiziq community member

12 April 2017

1 reply

"For lying" and "for having lied"?

I guess this is more of an English question. What is the difference between "for lying" and "for having lied"?

Gruff

Kwiziq language super star

13 April 2017

13/04/17

In this context the two forms can be used interchangeably in English without changing the sense in most cases, but you can't use use the gerund form (for +-ing) the same way in in this sort of sentence in French. Does that answer your question?

Charles

Kwiziq community member

13 February 2017

3 replies

De versus Pour with "for doing" expressions

I've used this expression on my French mentor several times and he hasn't corrected me: "Merci pour m'avoid appelé." I've also read and heard expressions like this several times: "Merci DE m'avoir prévenu." Are the words "de" and "pour" interchangeable in this type of expression? Many thanks in advance

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

13 March 2017

13/03/17

Bonjour Charles ! I find it strange that your French mentor didn't correct you there, because you cannot say "Merci pour + verb" in French: it will always be "merci *de* + verb". However, you can use interchangeably "merci pour/de + noun", as such: "Merci de votre patience." "Merci pour votre patience." I hope that's helpful! À bientôt !

Charles

Kwiziq community member

13 March 2017

13/03/17

Bonjour Aurélie, Merci de m'avoir répondu! It seems that presence of the word "merci" changes the structure of the "for doing" phrase, am I right? To borrow from the Level 5 "for doing lesson": Tu auras une médaille pour avoir sauvé ce chat. = You will have a medal for saving this cat. But if I want to say "Thanks for saving the cat" it becomes "Merci D'avoir sauve ce chat." ?? Same thing if a pronoun is introduced? Tu auras une médaille pour m'avoir sauvé. = You will have a medal for saving me. BUT "Thanks for saving me" = Merci DE m'avoir sauvé. Nest-ce pas? This comes up a lot in everyday interaction so I want to make sure I'm getting it right! Merci en avance, Charles

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

13 March 2017

13/03/17

Bonjour Charles ! Yes indeed, these are two separate structures, as "merci de + infinitive" is a different expression altogether. "Pour que" in French is mostly used to express purpose = "for/in order to ". Bonne journée !

ly fen

Kwiziq community member

12 January 2016

7 replies

Hi, can we only use "pour+infinitive" in the present time, if an action is not happened yet?

example: Je lui dire pour l'aider, or Il m'aide pour terminer ce travail plus vite.

Laura

Kwiziq language super star

12 January 2016

12/01/16

Bonjour Iy fen, No, you can use it in other tenses: Je lui ai dit pour l'aider, Il m'a aidé pour terminer plus vite. Je lui dirais pour l'aider, Il m'aidera pour terminer plus vite.

ly fen

Kwiziq community member

12 January 2016

12/01/16

Bonjour, Merci de votre réponse, selon ce que j'ai compris, on ne peut l'utiliser que dans le passé composé, le conditionnel ou le futur alors.

Laura

Kwiziq language super star

12 January 2016

12/01/16

Bonjour - Non, pas du tout. Je ne vous ai donné que quelques exemples - on peut l'utiliser avec tous les temps / modes.

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

15 January 2016

15/01/16

Bonjour Ly, "pour + infinitive" simply means "in order to", so you can use it in any context that expresses a goal to reach, whether it being in the past, present, future ...! Hope that's helpful!

ly fen

Kwiziq community member

16 January 2016

16/01/16

Bonjour, Thank you very much for your explanation, I understand now that we can use in any tense, so if we add "que" then we must use in subjunctive right? ex :Vous me l'expliqué pour que je le comprenne? is it right? my sentence ?

Laura

Kwiziq language super star

16 January 2016

16/01/16

Yes, pour que requires the subjunctive. Your sentence is almost right: Vous me l'expliquez (or "me l'avez expliqué") pour que je le comprenne.

ly fen

Kwiziq community member

17 January 2016

17/01/16

Je vous remercie beaucoup. A bientôt ! si j'aurais autre question à vous poser.
I'll be right with you...