Avoir d’habitue de

DB1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Avoir d’habitue de

I’m confused by the instruction given for how to use this phrase.  Both present and imparfait are defined as “used to” in the examples.  what am I missing?  Of course for the very first question about this topic I bombed. And I don’t know why. Is there any additional instruction on this topic?

Asked 1 year ago
MaartenC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor Correct answer

The present tense translates to English ‘I am used to.. ‘ contracted in the example to ‘I’m used to..’. 

The imparfait ‘ translates to ‘ I used to…’. 

The difficulty here arises, I think,  from the English meanings of ‘am used to..’ as compared to just ‘used to ..’ 

ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

It may be easier to think of avoir l'habitude de... as "to be in the habit of..."

This English construction gives you a better handle on how to use the French one.

J'ai l'abitude de me lever à 6 heures. -- I'm in the habit of getting up at 6 am. / I'm used to getting up at 6 am.

Avoir d’habitue de

I’m confused by the instruction given for how to use this phrase.  Both present and imparfait are defined as “used to” in the examples.  what am I missing?  Of course for the very first question about this topic I bombed. And I don’t know why. Is there any additional instruction on this topic?

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