Direct object sentence

NicoleA1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Direct object sentence

Hello,

I am doing the A1 reading passage for the Cher journal and the sentence I'm confused on is. Il me reste des crosissants du weekend. 

I know il me reste is a direct object sentence but not sure how the meaning of the word reste is used here.

I think it means he has leftover croissants?


Thanks

Nicole

Asked 1 year ago
CélineKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Bonjour Nicole,

On top of all the brilliant answers from Maarten and Chris, here is a link to a similar question that Cécile answered recently:

il-me-reste

The examples given should help you in understanding how to translate the phrase. 

I hope this is helpful.

Bonne journée!

MaartenC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

«Il me reste» uses an impersonal verb construction and yes, it can be (free) translated as "I have croissants left (over) from the weekend" https://www.lawlessfrench.com/grammar/impersonal-verbs/

ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Just to add to Maarten's explanation, here is a more literal translation which may help you in parsing the French sentence (note that the English is also impersonal):

Il me reste des croissants du weekend. -- There are croissants left from the weekend.

NicoleA1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Thank you all for answering my question I will look into that. 

PaulC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Just to clarify the response from Chis - In my opinion "There are croissants left from the weekend" would just be "Il reste des croissants du weekend". The addition of "me" in the sentence "Il me reste ..." implies they are left to ME, or as Maarten says "I (me) have some left over". (Hope that hasn't added confusion, but the "me" in "il me reste" is what they call a COI)

Direct object sentence

Hello,

I am doing the A1 reading passage for the Cher journal and the sentence I'm confused on is. Il me reste des crosissants du weekend. 

I know il me reste is a direct object sentence but not sure how the meaning of the word reste is used here.

I think it means he has leftover croissants?


Thanks

Nicole

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