Du de la … is used for some , but what about “of the” from the

FawadA0Kwiziq community member

Du de la … is used for some , but what about “of the” from the

I understand that du can be used as some e-g je prende du cafe 

But what about these ones ? 

où se trouve l'office (de la) du tourisme ? Can it be used as of ? 

avez-vous un guide de la ville ?

je viens du super marché


What does du , de and du means here ? 

Asked 2 weeks ago
ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor Correct answer

"L'office du tourisme" can also be written as "l'office de tourisme". The noun is le tourisme (masculine). Either version (with or without "le", i.e., de as well as du) are correct and in use.

L'office de/du tourisme. -- The tourist office, office of tourism
Le guide de la ville. -- The city guide, a guide of the city
Je viens du super marché -- I'm coming from the supermarket.

The topic when to use "de" and when "de la", "du" or "des" can be a bit tricky. Even though your question links to the lesson for the partitive article, none of your examples contain a partitive article. Just making sure you're aware of it.

JimC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Hi Fawad,

The key aspect of grammar that you will need to master is Articles.

In English we use "the" but in French le, la, or l' with single nouns and les before plural nouns.

Le and les compound with à and de to produce au, aux and du, des (of the).

So I suggest you revisit definite, indefinite, and partitive articles to aid your further understanding.

Hope this helps.

Jim

AvasiesB1Kwiziq community member

so basically the way i learned it was that for feminine nouns, when you use the partitive article, you say "de la" but for masculine nouns it is "du" and then there's also "de l'" for nouns that start with a vowel/h muet, and then des for plural nouns.  they all mean the same it depends on the noun. so basically you'd say "some food" = "de la nourriture" & "some milk" = "du lait". de la and du are the same. to answer your other question, de + les = des, and de+le = du, de la stays the same and doesn't combine. 

SO, it would be où se trouve l'office  du tourisme?  because tourisme is a masculine noun; le tourisme: the tourism. du can be used as "of the" because de+le means of + the and combines to make du.  for "avez-vous un guide de la ville?" it is just de la because "ville" is feminine and they dont combine. for "je viens du super marche," du can mean from + the. 

CélineKwiziq team member

Bonjour Fawad,

To supplement Chris's answer, please follow the links below:

de vs du

Article Partitif  vs  Article contracté

I hope this is helpful.

Bonne journée !

Du de la … is used for some , but what about “of the” from the

I understand that du can be used as some e-g je prende du cafe 

But what about these ones ? 

où se trouve l'office (de la) du tourisme ? Can it be used as of ? 

avez-vous un guide de la ville ?

je viens du super marché


What does du , de and du means here ? 

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