Getting the English right........

MaxC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Getting the English right........

In the lesson you state:

Ni l'un(e) ni l'autre ne... means neither one nor the other or neither (of them).

English is my native language and I would never say "neither one nor the other". I would say "Neither the one nor the other" or better, as offered "Neither." "Neither one nor the other" just doesn't sound right. "Neither one" seems sufficient (and a third alternative) making the addition of "nor the other" seem superfluous and inappropriate. I wonder if this isn't a dialectical difference within North America. 

Asked 2 years ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Max,

May I refer you to this Kwiziq page which may or may not answer your specific question but illustrates the many queries we get about the English used on the site -

https://www.kwiziq.com/is-this-english-correct

Hope it helps!

MaartenC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

As another native and “long term” English speaker, not from North America, I have no problem with “Neither one nor the other …”., nor with “neither” or “neither one”. All heard regularly in use in the colony.

I would never say “neither the one, nor the other, .. “ (that would sound very formal here, to say it as politely as I can). 

Sounds like minor regional differences. 

ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Sometimes it's really difficult to keep all the English speakers happy, since there's a lot of regional variation. May I suggest we focus more on the French as long as it is clear what is meant by the English translation?

Getting the English right........

In the lesson you state:

Ni l'un(e) ni l'autre ne... means neither one nor the other or neither (of them).

English is my native language and I would never say "neither one nor the other". I would say "Neither the one nor the other" or better, as offered "Neither." "Neither one nor the other" just doesn't sound right. "Neither one" seems sufficient (and a third alternative) making the addition of "nor the other" seem superfluous and inappropriate. I wonder if this isn't a dialectical difference within North America. 

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