"Gregory is going away for the holidays"

ValerieB2Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

"Gregory is going away for the holidays"

I selected "pour" yet the answer also included pendant/durant. My understanding is that the latter has to specify a time duration. But this statement doesn't. Can you explain why it can be considered a correct way to translate the sentence? Thanks. Valerie

Asked 3 months ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Valerie,

Both answers give a slightly different meaning but both are possible.

If you say -

Gregory part pour les vacances 

it means that he is going away for his holidays, in other words, he is not having a staycation.

but if you say -

Gregory part pendant/durant les vacances 

it means that during his holiday period he is going to go away.

Slight difference I know but remember -

pour for (intent)

pendant during ( duration) 

Hope this helps!

AshishA2Kwiziq community member

I have the same query as Valerie, can anybody help us on this? Thanks in advance. Ashish

"Gregory is going away for the holidays"

I selected "pour" yet the answer also included pendant/durant. My understanding is that the latter has to specify a time duration. But this statement doesn't. Can you explain why it can be considered a correct way to translate the sentence? Thanks. Valerie

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