How could you say "Gregory is going away for the holidays." ?

How could you say "Gregory is going away for the holidays." ?

I understand that "Gregory part pour les vacances." works and seems to match the following less example most closely: "Nous irons en Guadeloupe pour les vacances."

However, I don't understand how durant and pendant also work with this example. Can someone kindly explain it as I don't see how it matches the examples in the lesson. Thanks in advance!

Asked 6 months ago
CécileKwiziq language super starCorrect answer

Hi Alex,

I think you would have to say -

"Gregory s'en va pour les vacances."  

to indicate he is not staying at home using the verb 's'en aller'.  

The use of the verb partir is too close to the expression 'partir en vacances' (to go on holiday) and this will clarify the meaning...

Hope this helps!

Hi Cécile,

Thanks for your quick response. Looks like I lost a couple letters in my initial reply, it should read "lesson example" not "less example." The subject is the title of one of the questions I received in the quiz and 3 answers were marked correct:

How could you say "Gregory is going away for the holidays." ?Gregory part durant les vacances.Gregory part pendant les vacances.Gregory part pour les vacances.

I think I understand why "Gregory part pour les vacances" works, but need some assistance for the durant and pendant answers and why that also works. The answer was marked as nearly correct with just the single answer checked, so it may be a subtle reason that I can't seem to determine reading through the lesson. Any help would be much appreciated, thanks!

oof, the reply field seems to display the text much more differently than what is actually published, let's try this again:

How could you say "Gregory is going away for the holidays." ?

Gregory part durant les vacances.

Gregory part pendant les vacances.

Gregory part pour les vacances.

Each of the three above answers is marked by kwiziq bot as correct.

CécileKwiziq language super star

In my opinion, the first two sentences mean that during Gregory’s holiday period , he will go away and the last one means that for his holidays Gregory is going away. 

So they are all correct with slightly different meanings.

Hope this helps!

CécileKwiziq language super star

In my opinion, the first two sentences mean that during Gregory’s holiday period , he will go away and the last one means that for his holidays Gregory is going away. 

So they are all correct with slightly different meanings.

Hope this helps!

DA2

I agree with Alex regarding ; part durant, part pendant, and part pour les vacances.   There is no beginning or end specified thus pour was the only one I selected.

The instruction on this topic is insufficient to determine the correct response according to Kwiziq.

How could you say "Gregory is going away for the holidays." ?

I understand that "Gregory part pour les vacances." works and seems to match the following less example most closely: "Nous irons en Guadeloupe pour les vacances."

However, I don't understand how durant and pendant also work with this example. Can someone kindly explain it as I don't see how it matches the examples in the lesson. Thanks in advance!

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