Il fait vs C'est

Trevor A1Kwiziq community member

Il fait vs C'est

So, in the real world, I won't hear "C'est humide" if I ask about the weather on a rainy day?

Asked 1 year ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Trevor, 

For an atmospheric condition, you will use 'faire humide'.

For instance, you might say about Singapore-

À Singapour, il fait chaud et humide toute l'année = It's hot and humid in Singapore all year round

 

Trevor A1Kwiziq community member

Cheers Cécile,

"C'est humide" would be me "Anglicising" the translation. I suspect that there would be many colloquial responses which, though incorrect, would be in common usage - at least that's how it is in my world. That would be something for learning "on the spot", not in class.

MaartenC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Just to follow this up as the comment suggests there may be something overly academic about Cécile’s answer here - it is exceedingly unlikely you would ever hear (never say never, but never fits here) a native French speaker use ‘c’est quelque chose (adjective)’ in reference to the weather - ‘Il (faire)’ or ‘Il y (avoir).  If ‘c’est’ is an anglicisme heard anywhere for weather, then it is one used by anglophones.

It sounds every bit as weird in French as “It makes hot” does in English.

Il fait vs C'est

So, in the real world, I won't hear "C'est humide" if I ask about the weather on a rainy day?

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