"le seau des véreuses" is translated as "worm-eaten ones' bucket" but does not véreuse mean unreliable/doubtful?

MARTINA1Kwiziq community member

"le seau des véreuses" is translated as "worm-eaten ones' bucket" but does not véreuse mean unreliable/doubtful?

Asked 1 month ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Martin,

Thank you for pointing this out, the English has been changed, hope you like it better.

Bonne Continuation !

 

 

MaartenC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Martin, ‘ véreux/se ‘ has a figurative sense as you note indicating dubious character. 

It also has a primary meaning translating to English as wormy/maggot-ridden etc as translated in the context in the transcript. The adjective derives from the noun ‘ le ver (les vers) ‘.

Another example from Larousse eg une poire véreuse

 https://www.larousse.fr/dictionnaires/francais/véreux/81506

 https://www.larousse.fr/dictionnaires/francais/ver/81461

 https://www.wordreference.com/fren/vereuse

CécileKwiziq team member

Hi Martin, 

Just to add to what Maarten has said, here we are talking of chestnuts that have been damaged by worms.

I am not sure whether the English translation is very elegant so will query it and come back to you. Maybe 'the bucket for grubby ones' may be more apt.

 

MaartenC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Cécile, it is certainly not the way I would express it in English !

If wanting to keep the ‘worm’ reference specifically, ‘ the bucket for the wormy ones ‘ would be one way that sounds more natural to me. 

"le seau des véreuses" is translated as "worm-eaten ones' bucket" but does not véreuse mean unreliable/doubtful?

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