Les cloches sont passées

Andrew

Kwiziq community member

15 December 2016

2 replies

Les cloches sont passées

Les cloches sont passées ce matin pour apporter les œufs de Pâques. The bells passed this morning to bring the Easter eggs. HINT: (In France, it's bells that bring the Easter eggs, not a bunny!) Is this expression idiomatic as the rules above dont seem to apply or have I missed something? Thanks.

This question relates to:
French lesson "Passer can be used with avoir or être in Le Passé Composé... and changes meaning"

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

15 December 2016

15/12/16

Bonjour Andrew ! No, here it's the case of passer meaning "to pass by", it's simply not followed by a prepositional group, but used on its own as an intransitive verb. ps: Look also at the meanings implied by the auxiliaries être or avoir :) I hope that's helpful! À bientôt !

Andrew

Kwiziq community member

15 December 2016

15/12/16

Yes!!! That's great... that's what I hoped it meant!! (Or should that be "that's what I hoped it HAD meant??") LOL. Thanks.

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