Qu’est-ce que te manque .. means What are you missing. Why is it te and not tu? Tx

Rod

Kwiziq community member

27 October 2017

4 replies

Qu’est-ce que te manque .. means What are you missing. Why is it te and not tu? Tx

This relates to:
Qu'est-ce qui + [verb] = What [does]... -

Rod

Kwiziq community member

27 October 2017

27/10/17

Sorry, meant Qu’est-ce qui te manque

Ron

Kwiziq community member

27 October 2017

27/10/17

Bonjour Rod,
Ah, one of my favorite French verbs. Here is the lesson that covers «manquer à»:
https://progress.lawlessfrench.com/my-languages/french/view/4559
Here is the lesson on using «plaire». I am sure there are other verbs in French that use the structure reversal but these are the two that I am most familiar with.
Basically, one states in French that «someone is missing to me» Quelqu'un me manque. when translated --> I miss (or lack) SOMEONE.
Please read over the two referenced lessons above and if that does not provide clarification,
here are a couple of other links that might help:
https://www.thoughtco.com/how-to-say-i-miss-you-in-french-1369632
https://www.frenchtoday.com/blog/french-vocabulary/i-miss-you-tu-me-manques-how-to-use-the-verb-manquer-in-french
I hope you find this useful.
Bonne chance.

Suzanne

Kwiziq community member

7 July 2018

7/07/18

What would be the most helpful would be an exercise with 10-20 questions where I was asked to select between Qu'est-ce que and Qu-est-ce qui. That is really the question - will I be able to select the right one in the right situation. 


Are there any focused exercises like this anywhere in Kwiziq? I heard there were but I haven't managed to find them.

Ron

Kwiziq community member

7 July 2018

7/07/18

Bonjour Suzanne,


While I know the grammar explanation to your question, the simplest way that I have found to remember the difference is this:


qu'est-ce que is usually followed by a noun subject


qu'est-ce qui is usually followed by a verb


While I understand this is an over-simplification, the structure in a phrase almost always is like this.


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