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Manquer (à) = To miss someone/something emotionally

The verb manquer is often very troublesome for English speakers of French because its structure is reversed when it applies to emotions compared to events.

Look at these sentences with the verb manquer in an emotional sense:

Mon ancienne école me manque .
I miss my old school.

Jean lui manque.
She/he misses Jean

Il manque à ma soeur.
My sister misses him.

Je manque à Thomas.
Thomas misses me.

When using manquer in the emotional sense, you must reverse the structure so it is the person or thing that is lacking to you:

Tu manques à Lise.
Lise misses you.

-> It's not Lise misses you. anymore, but literally You are lacking to Lise.

Elle me manque.
I miss her.

-> It's not I miss her, but literally She is lacking to me.

Je lui manque.
He misses me.

-> It's not He misses me, but literally I am lacking to him.

Now the 'missed' person or thing become the one doing the action of 'lacking'.

Introducing the person who is missing someone, who is "lacking" someone

You either use manquer à + [name]:

Nous manquons à Patricia.
Patricia misses us.

Léo manque à ma sœur.
My sister misses Léo.

or indirect pronouns me/te/lui/nous/vous/leur before manquer :

Hélène leur manque.
They miss Hélène.

Mon chien me manque.
I miss my dog.

 

It is different when talking about missing an event or a train, or lacking something in a pragmatic way.
See Manquer (de) + thing = To miss / lack something


As for using indirect pronouns, see Me, te, nous, vous = Me, you, us, you (direct and indirect object pronouns) and Replacing people with lui, leur = him, her, them (indirect object pronouns)

 

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Jean lui manque.
She/he misses Jean


Nous manquons à Patricia.
Patricia misses us.


Ma mère me manque.
I miss my mum


Je manque à Thomas.
Thomas misses me.


Je lui manque.
He misses me.


Il manque à ma soeur.
My sister misses him.


Mon chien me manque.
I miss my dog.


Elle me manque.
I miss her.


Tu manques à Lise.
Lise misses you.


Hélène leur manque.
They miss Hélène.


Mon ancienne école me manque .
I miss my old school.


Léo manque à ma sœur.
My sister misses Léo.


Q&A

Katrina

Kwiziq community member

18 April 2018

1 reply

I really need to practise some of these over and over. How can I get more questions?

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

18 April 2018

18/04/18

Bonjour Katrina !


You can add lessons you specifically want to practise against to your notebook.


Here's a link that shows you how :)
https://progress.lawlessfrench.com/faq/notebooks


Bonne journée !

Ian

Kwiziq community member

8 April 2018

2 replies

Comment on dit "The cat misses me" Je manque au chat?

Chris

Kwiziq community member

11 April 2018

11/04/18

Hi Ian,


yes, that sounds correct.


-- Chris (not a native speaker).

Ian

Kwiziq community member

12 April 2018

12/04/18

Thanks Chris. It just sounded strange. Remerci.


Paul

Kwiziq community member

2 February 2018

1 reply

Je manque à Alain - Alain misses me

I think that is translation is particularly tricky because of the switch from me in English to I in French. Can you please include it in the examples for this lesson?

Gruff

Kwiziq language super star

14 April 2018

14/04/18

I agree it's especially tricky. We'll add some more examples of that form. Thanks!

James

Kwiziq community member

6 October 2017

5 replies

futur proche

James

Kwiziq community member

6 October 2017

6/10/17

oops, sorry, typed in the wrong box ...

Ron

Kwiziq community member

6 October 2017

6/10/17

Bonjour James,
Est-ce qu'il y a une question en ce qui concerne cette leçon?
Bonne journée.

James

Kwiziq community member

8 October 2017

8/10/17

Oui, peut-être. Avec le futur proche, est-ce qu’on dit <>, ou est-ce qu’on dit <> ou, peut-être, autre chose?

James

Kwiziq community member

8 October 2017

8/10/17

should have said this - Oui, peut-être. Avec le futur proche, est-ce qu’on dit “je vais tu manquer” ou est-ce qu’on dit “je vais tu me manques” ou, peut-être, autre chose?

information inside << >> was thrown out ...

Chris

Kwiziq community member

17 October 2017

17/10/17

Hi James, neither of the two sentences seem right to me.

If you want to say "You are going to miss me" -- "Je vais te manquer."
If you want to say "I am going to miss you" -- "Tu vas me manquer."

-- Chris (not a native speaker).

Melody

Kwiziq community member

11 September 2016

1 reply

Could you give a reminder/link re: lui vs. elle?

I had the question Translate "She misses Jacques". I chose "Jacques elle manque" (wrong) instead of "Jacques lui manque". The lesson states "...or to use pronouns (i.e. I, you, he, we, they... miss), you will use me/te/lui/nous/vous/leur before manquer.". Would it be possible to add a link to the relevant lesson about pronouns at the bottom of the lesson? It would be helpful to reference this, to understand which pronoun to use in this instance. Thanks.

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

12 September 2016

12/09/16

Bonjour Melody !

I've updated the lesson to include links to lessons and glossary articles on indirect object pronouns !

Merci et à bientôt !
I'll be right with you...