se promener - promener - se balader

Answered! Jump to accepted answer.

peter

Kwiziq community member

27 April 2018

2 replies

se promener - promener - se balader

I am not understanding the difference between promener, se promener and se balader could you please advise.

Chris

Kwiziq community member

27 April 2018

27/04/18

Hi Peter,

First, let's focus on promener versus se promener: the former is transitive (meaning the verb acts on something else than the subject of the sentence) the latter is reflexive (it acts on the subject of the sentence). Here is an example:

D'habitude je me promène le matin. -- Usually I take a walk in the morning. You don't get the reflexive thing in English, because the French construction doesn't work in English. Literally, the French sentence means: Usually I walk myself in the morning. "Se promener" literally means to "walk oneself".

Tu promènes ton chien chaque jour? -- Do you walk your dog every day? Clearly, the action now is on the dog (the object of the sentence) and not the subject itself. In French, therefore, you don't use the reflexive pronoun.

You could also say this:

Tu te promènes avec ton chien? -- Do you go for a walk with your dog? In this case you have the reflexive version because you are "walking yourself" and the dog is just taken along.

To define any difference in meaning between balder and promener I found this piece:

Emploi pronominal:
On peut dire : « J'aime bien me promener » et « j'aime bien me balader », les deux sont corrects, se balader est considéré comme plus familier.

Emploi transitif :
« Je promène mes chiens ».
« Je promène mes enfants ou je les balade ».
Personnellement je ne balade que des personnes, je promène les chiens et trimbale les choses... mais je reconnais que certains baladent parfois des objets et des chiens, bien que cet emploi soit plus rare.

Emploi intransitif:
Balader ne s'emploie plus de façon intransitive de nos jours* (donc en ça je ne suis pas d'accord avec le wiktionnaire. Donc je ne dirais pas et « on aime bien balader ».

L'emploi intransitif de promener est considéré comme vieilli et régional (Dictionnaire historique en langue française - sld Alain Rey). En effet j'ai entendu « je vais promener » dans le midi, mais pas au nord de la Loire.

-- Chris (not a native speaker).

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

27 April 2018

27/04/18

Hi Peter,

Both 'se promener' and 'se balader' mean the same thing ,  to stroll, to walk ( in a leisurely manner) .

'Promener' will have an object afterwards, Je vais promener mes chiens. ( I am going to take my dogs for a walk .

Le dimanche je promène mes enfants dans le parc. ( On Sundays I take my children for a stroll in the park.)

 

Hope this helps!

 

Your answer

Login to submit your answer

Don't have an account yet? Join today

Think you've got all the answers?

Test your French to the CEFR standard

find your French level »
3043questions6389answers126,734users
I'll be right with you...