Standalone adjectives

Noeline A1Kwiziq community member

Standalone adjectives

When we are using C'est plus the standalone adjective,is it always masculine and singular?on it can also be masculine and plural depending on the sentence ofcourse 

Asked 1 month ago
MaartenC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor Correct answer

Noeline, 

the rule applies only to stand-alone expressions of the form ' c'est (+/- adverb) adjective ' -  being " general " expressions, without a noun. 

In this structure ' ce sont ', the plural form of "c'est",  is not used, and the singular masculine form of the adjective  will always apply following ' c'est '. 

Of course, if using ' ce sont ', or indeed informally using ' c'est', followed by plural noun-adjective combinations, the adjective will agree in gender and plural form with the noun.  ( Adverbs are invariable regardless ).

See the attached lesson and links to Laura Lawless site for a discussion of rules and realities of using ' c'est ' or ' ce sont '.

C'est, ce sont = this is, these are (French Demonstrative Pronouns) 

https://www.lawlessfrench.com/grammar/cest-vs-il-est/ 

 https://www.lawlessfrench.com/expressions/cest/

Standalone adjectives

When we are using C'est plus the standalone adjective,is it always masculine and singular?on it can also be masculine and plural depending on the sentence ofcourse 

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