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using de in plural instead of des

Garfield P.A1Kwiziq community member

using de in plural instead of des

why is it - le ciel est couvert de nuages and not

le ciel est couvert des nuages? since nuages is a noun and not an adj. shouldnt it be des?

Asked 2 years ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Garfield,

The 'de' here is a preposition normally would translate as of or from but here it is with, in English.

La table est couverte de jolie vaisselle = The table is covered with pretty china

Le devoir est rempli de fautes = The homework is full of mistakes

Hope this helps!

 

 

Maarten K.C1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

“Être (adjective/past participle) de” is the structure here. Effectively “is covered with (some) clouds. De + partitive article - no contraction, so remains “ de nuages”. See link :

https://www.lawlessfrench.com/grammar/verbs-with-de/

Chris W.C1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

You have here a verbal construction which requires "de". In this case you leave of the partitive article, it is implied. If you did add the article, it would be interpreted not as a partitive article but as a definite article, as if you were talking about some specific clouds (whatever that means).

Le ciel est couvert de nouages. -- The sky is covered with clouds.
Le ciel est couvert des nouages. -- The sky is covered with the clouds.

using de in plural instead of des

why is it - le ciel est couvert de nuages and not

le ciel est couvert des nuages? since nuages is a noun and not an adj. shouldnt it be des?

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