Why is this the correct answer? ‘Les peintures moderns lui plaisent.Why is there not

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Sandra

Kwiziq community member

26 October 2017

9 replies

Why is this the correct answer? ‘Les peintures moderns lui plaisent.Why is there not

This question relates to:
French lesson "Using "plaire" to express liking something / someone"

Sandra

Kwiziq community member

26 October 2017

26/10/17

I meant to add ‘Why is there not ‘à’ or an example of why the answer is correct in the lesson?’ Has something gone over my head?

Chris

Kwiziq community member

26 October 2017

26/10/17

Take, for example, the sentence "Je parle à Marie." -- I talk to Marie. And now take a look at "Je lui parle." -- I talk to her. You'll notice that the "à" has vanished. It's been absorbed into the pronoun "lui" which replaces an indirect object in a sentence.

"Les peintures plaisent à Pierre." -- Pierre likes the paintings.
"Les peintures lui plaisent." -- He likes the paintings (no "à" in this case).

I hope that helps, -- Chris (not a native speaker)

Ron

Kwiziq community member

26 October 2017

26/10/17

Les très bons exemples. Merci !

Sandra

Kwiziq community member

27 October 2017

27/10/17

Perhaps it would help to put Claus’ examples in the lesson. I’m sure I’m not the only one who found this confusing.

Sandra

Kwiziq community member

27 October 2017

27/10/17

Thank you very much Claus. It’s not entirely clear to me yet. However with your explanation I can work on where I am lacking background knowledge such as indirect objects:)

Ron

Kwiziq community member

27 October 2017

27/10/17

Bonjour Sandra, The other verb that uses the subject indirect object reversal is «manquer à». You might possibly find some clarity by taking a look at that verb. Sentence syntax is the same as for «plaire», i.e. the subject is the thing that pleases or is missed by the person represented by the indirect object.

Chris

Kwiziq community member

28 October 2017

28/10/17

To check if it is a direct or indirect object substitute a name for it (e.g., Marie, and don't worry if the sentence doesn't make much sense anymore). And if there is a preposition in front of the name, it is an indirect object. Otherwise it is a direct object. To wit, first in English: Lucy eats an apple. First, substitute Marie for the part in question: Lucy eats Marie. No preposition in front of Marie, hence a direct object. Lucy talks to me. Substitute Marie: Lucy talks to Marie. There is a preposition in front of Marie, hence an jndirect object. In French: Lucie parle à Marie -- indirect object. Lucie mange des pommes : Lucie mange Marie : direct object. -- Chris.

Sandra

Kwiziq community member

28 October 2017

28/10/17

Thank you Ron. Manquer à has always confused me to with regard to who is missing whom. So I’ll tackle both together until I wrangle the sense out of them!

Sandra

Kwiziq community member

28 October 2017

28/10/17

Thank you for the extra information Chris. I appreciate you taking the time.

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