Forming adverbs from adjectives ending in -ant and -ent

Look at these adverbs:

Ce fil est apparent, mais apparemment personne ne l'a remarqué.
This thread is showing, but apparently no one noticed it.

Notre amitié est récente: nous nous sommes rencontrés récemment.
Our friendship is recent: we met recently.

Cette réponse est évidente: c'est évidemment 1515. 
This answer is obvious: it's obviously 1515.

Ce train est fréquent: il vient fréquemment. 
This train is frequent: it comes frequently.

Marc est très patient: il attend patiemment.
Marc is very patient: he's waiting patiently.

When turned into adverbs, adjectives ending in -ant and -ent act as follows:

-ant becomes -amment 
-ent becomes -emment 
Pronunciation: -emment and -amment both pronounce the same = [aman]

 

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Marc est très patient: il attend patiemment.
Marc is very patient: he's waiting patiently.


Notre amitié est récente: nous nous sommes rencontrés récemment.
Our friendship is recent: we met recently.



Le temps n'est pas constant: il change constamment.
The weather is not constant: it changes constantly.


Ce langage est courant: il est parlé couramment par de nombreuses personnes.
This language is common: it is spoken fluently by many people.


Ce fil est apparent, mais apparemment personne ne l'a remarqué.
This thread is showing, but apparently no one noticed it.


Cette réponse est évidente: c'est évidemment 1515. 
This answer is obvious: it's obviously 1515.


Ce train est fréquent: il vient fréquemment. 
This train is frequent: it comes frequently.


Q&A

Max

Kwiziq community member

18 October 2018

2 replies

This thread is apparent, but apparently no one noticed it. - !!!!!!!

Does the question writer mean to ask if a thread is "showing"? The question is not IMO stated in idiomatic English. I can't make the question make sense even if the thread in question is an email thread. Maybe I'm being picky.........

Alan

Kwiziq community member

18 October 2018

18/10/18

Yes, I think the problem is that in English we only use apparent for abstract nouns - "no apparent reason", "an apparent danger" etc. So it should probably be translated as "visible", or maybe your suggestion of "showing" would work in this case. But that would spoil the word play of the original - 

Ce fil est apparent, mais apparemment  personne ne l'a remarqué.

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

19 October 2018

19/10/18

Bonjour Max !

Indeed, "showing" would be more colloquial here, and thanks to you, it's now been updated :)

Merci et bonne journée !

Margaret

Kwiziq community member

24 May 2018

2 replies

I don't understand why: "David and Jean speak fluent Spanish" isn't correct? Lawless answer was: "David and Jean speak Spanish fluently

Chris

Kwiziq community member

25 May 2018

25/05/18

Hi Margaret, the lesson is about forming adverbs. The answer was looking for this. In "fluent Spanish", "fluent" is an adjective, not an adverb. It isn't wrong but it isn't what they were looking for.

-- Chris (not a native speaker).

Max

Kwiziq community member

18 October 2018

18/10/18

My problem is taking a test w/o knowing what the lesson it was based on. Fortunately, I know when to ignore these issues. 

Terri

Kwiziq community member

24 April 2018

4 replies

I don't understand why "Currently speak Spanish" is not a correct answer.

I don't understand why currently speak Spanish is not a correct answer. Couramment means currently, correct? It also means fluently, but how is someone to know which definition you are using in this particular example? Please help. Thanks, Terri"

Alan

Kwiziq community member

24 April 2018

24/04/18

Actually, couramment doesn't mean currently, it means commonly, frequently or fluently

Currently would be actuellement. (Which doesn't mean actually.)

These are both faux amis.

Terri

Kwiziq community member

24 April 2018

24/04/18

My, I feel silly. Sorry for asking such a basic question. Thank you for the correction, and for both faux amis.

Chris

Kwiziq community member

26 April 2018

26/04/18

Hi Terri, don't beat yourself up about it. Such experiences are actually valuable. I guess you won't forget the meaning of couramment anytime soon. ;)

-- Chris.

Max

Kwiziq community member

18 October 2018

18/10/18

If I remember correctly...

actuel = CURRENT

réel = ACTUAL

Dragana

Kwiziq community member

28 January 2018

2 replies

d'autres or des autres

In the test " Il exprime sa haine des autres ardemment . He expresses his hate for others ardently." Is this not "the others" because it is des rather than d'

Chris

Kwiziq community member

29 January 2018

29/01/18

As I understand it, "des autres" are "the others" and I know no other way how to say this. However: Des autres ordinateurs -- The other computers. D'autres ordinateurs -- Other computers. When you use "autres" as a noun by itself, as in your example "sa haine des autres" you need the article and hence "de + les = des". If "autres" is used as an adjective as in "autres ordinateurs" you can either include the article (des autres ordinateurs = the other computers) or not (d'autres ordinateurs = other computers). -- Chris (not a native speaker).

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

30 January 2018

30/01/18

Bonjour Dragana !

Here it's due to the fact that in French when you talk about things in general - here "others/other people" in general - you need to use the definite article (le, la, l', les), hence the use of des, and not d' .

See also https://progress.lawlessfrench.com/revision/grammar/use-le-la-l-or-les-before-nouns-when-generalising-definite-articles


I hope that's helpful!
Bonne journée !

Damien

Kwiziq community member

18 December 2017

2 replies

lent as adverb

This lesson says -ent adjectives become -emment adverbs. However a previous lesson said lent becomes lentement as adverb. Are both spelling forms accepted?

Chris

Kwiziq community member

18 December 2017

18/12/17

No, "lentement" is definitely correct. Lentemment is wrong.
I would guess that the adjective "lent" is simply too short to claim that its stem is simple "l-". Therefore the rule doesn't apply here. That's how I would argue it before a judge ;)

-- Chris (not a native speaker).

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

19 December 2017

19/12/17

Bonjour Damien !

The adjective lent can never become lemment, for the simple reason that it would make the stem of the word disappear, due to the shortness of the adjective in the first place :)
Therefore, here the regular rule of using the feminine adjective as the basis of the adverb applies:
lente-ment

Bonne journée !

Nigel

Kwiziq community member

8 November 2017

3 replies

Saying 1515

in the spoken response saying "Cette réponse est évidente: c'est évidemment 1515" the speaker seems to say "mille cent cinq quinze". Is that correct or am I miss hearing it. If I'm not miss hearing it, why is it cent cinq and not cinq cent?

Ron

Kwiziq community member

9 November 2017

9/11/17

Bonjour Nigel, It is possible you are miss hearing it because, like you noted, it would be «mille cinq cent quinze» with the number coming before cent and the same way with mille, i.e. deux mille cinq cent.

Chris

Kwiziq community member

11 November 2017

11/11/17

Often times one also encounters, as in English, "quinze cent quinze" instead of "mille cinque cent quinze". -- Chris.

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

22 June 2018

22/06/18

Hi Nigel,

Having listened to the recording, I can confirm that it says "mille cinq cent quinze" but we could also say "Quinze cent quinze" , which is of course the most famous date in history for school children as it is so easy to remember! The battle of Marignan.

Hope this helps!

diana

Kwiziq community member

1 July 2017

7 replies

So couramment goes in front of the noun?

Ron

Kwiziq community member

1 July 2017

1/07/17

Bonjour Diana, «So couramment goes in front of the noun?» In a word, no. A general rule of thumb is this: an adverb follows the verb. https://progress.lawlessfrench.com/my-languages/french/view/125 Here's the take away from this lesson: Notice that in simple sentences, adverbs are placed right after the verb. You will notice that this states in simple sentences, and of course like everything else in français, there are exceptions which is my reasoning for stating that it is a general rule of thumb.

Beverley

Kwiziq community member

2 July 2017

2/07/17

For example He speaks French fluently. = Il parle francais couramment and He is fluent = Il parle couramment. Beverley

diana

Kwiziq community member

2 July 2017

2/07/17

HI again, I think there may be a similar example somewhere on your site, but I can't find it, so I took this from somewhere else. "Cette expression française qui date du dix-neuvième siècle est couramment utilisée de nos jours. " Couramment is before the verb, and the meaning changes.

Ron

Kwiziq community member

3 July 2017

3/07/17

Actually couramment is in the middle of the compound verb structure "est utilisée"

Beverley

Kwiziq community member

3 July 2017

3/07/17

Comme d'habitude avec des adverbes?

Ron

Kwiziq community member

3 July 2017

3/07/17

Merci, Beverley.

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

6 July 2017

6/07/17

Bonjour Beverley !

In French, adverbs tend to be quite flexible :)
We teach the main rule as this is always correct, but then you can sometimes have some "poetic licence", especially in short sentences.

In the case you mentioned, both placements are correct in French:
"Je parle couramment (le) français."
or
"Je parle (le) français couramment."

I hope that's helpful!
À bientôt!

Mikhail

Kwiziq community member

23 June 2016

2 replies

In one of the examples the irrelevant number is next to the actual text

The example "Cette réponse est évidente: c'est évidemment 1515" - the number is read aloud as well. :)

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

28 June 2016

28/06/16

Bonjour Mikhail ! Here the number in question is a very famous date in French history, and the sentence refers to an exam situation for example, where you'd say "Of course the answer was [year].". I hope that's helpful!

Mikhail

Kwiziq community member

28 June 2016

28/06/16

Ah! Thank you, I feel silly now :)
Getting that for you now.