Conjugate -eter and -eler verbs in Le Présent - main rule (ll / tt)

Verbs ending in -ETER, -ELER such as jeter, rejeter, empaqueter, appeler, épeler, ficeler, chanceler etc. are semi-regular -ER verbs in Présent indicatif, which means that, even though they take the regular -ER endings of Présent indicatif, their spelling and subsequently their pronunciation vary. 

The majority of -ETER and -ELER verbs follow this rule:

With je/tu/il/elle/on/ils/elles, you double the T (-eter) or the L (-eler).

ATTENTION: 
Verbs in -ETTER, -ELLER and -E(xx)ER (errer, blesser, laisser etc.) are not included in this rule: they follow the regular pattern. 

Here are the conjugations for APPELER (to call) :

j'appelle
tu appelles
il/elle/on appelle
nous appelons
vous appelez
ils/elles appellent

Of course, the pronunciation is affected: -ell- is pronounced [L], whereas -el- is [ull]. 

Here are the conjugations for JETER (to throw) :

je jette
tu jettes
il/elle/on jette
nous jetons
vous jetez
ils/elles jettent

Of course, the pronunciation is affected: -ett- is pronounced [ett], whereas -et- is [utt].

Listen to these extra examples:

Il jette sa ligne, puis nous jetons nos lignes.
He casts his line, then we cast our lines.

Je m'appelle Simon et vous vous appelez Gareth et Aurélie.
My name is Simon and your names are Gareth and Aurélie.

Je vous rappelle mais vous, vous ne me rappelez jamais.
I call you back but you never call me back.

Ils rejettent sa proposition, mais nous ne la rejetons pas.
They reject his proposal, but we don't reject it.

Il projette d'aller en France, alors que nous projetons d'aller en Suisse.
He plans to go to France, whereas we plan to go to Switzerland.

La maîtresse épelle le mot, puis nous l'épelons aussi.
The teacher spells the word, and then we spell it too.

L'ivrogne chancelle mais nous ne chancelons jamais.
The drunk staggers but we never stagger.

Anna renouvelle sa garde-robe tout le temps, mais vous renouvelez rarement la vôtre.
Anna renews her wardrobe all the time, but you rarely renew yours.

Le héros ruisselle de sueur.
The hero is dripping with sweat.

Mon bébé hoquette souvent, mais vous ne hoquetez jamais.
My baby hiccups often, but you never hiccup.

Note the spelling reform of 1990 also accepts the use of the accent è instead of the doubled consonant for these verbs (for example je chancelle / je chancèle) but this DOES NOT APPLY to appeler, jeter and their derivatives

Though as we mentioned, most of the -ETER and -ELER verbs double their consonants, with every rule come exceptions

The following -ETER and -ELER verbs behave differently: they always and ONLY take the accent è on the first -e (-eter/-eler):

-ELER: agneler - celer - receler - ciseler - démanteler - écarteler - s'encasteler - geler (and derivatives: dégeler, congeler, surgeler- marteler - modeler - peler

-ETER: acheter (and derivatives:racheter- bégueter - corseter - crocheter - fileter - fureter - haleter

To learn and practise them, see the related lesson: Conjugate -eter and -eler verbs in Le Présent - exceptions in 'è'

 

And to study other -E(-)ER and -É(-)ER verbs, see Conjugate -é(-)er, -e(-)er verbs in Le Présent (except -eter and -eler)

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Je m'appelle Simon et vous vous appelez Gareth et Aurélie.
My name is Simon and your names are Gareth and Aurélie.


Mon bébé hoquette souvent, mais vous ne hoquetez jamais.
My baby hiccups often, but you never hiccup.


Il projette d'aller en France, alors que nous projetons d'aller en Suisse.
He plans to go to France, whereas we plan to go to Switzerland.


Le héros ruisselle de sueur.
The hero is dripping with sweat.


Ils rejettent sa proposition, mais nous ne la rejetons pas.
They reject his proposal, but we don't reject it.


Anna renouvelle sa garde-robe tout le temps, mais vous renouvelez rarement la vôtre.
Anna renews her wardrobe all the time, but you rarely renew yours.


Je vous rappelle mais vous, vous ne me rappelez jamais.
I call you back but you never call me back.


L'ivrogne chancelle mais nous ne chancelons jamais.
The drunk staggers but we never stagger.


Il jette sa ligne, puis nous jetons nos lignes.
He casts his line, then we cast our lines.


La maîtresse épelle le mot, puis nous l'épelons aussi.
The teacher spells the word, and then we spell it too.


Q&A

Lisa

Kwiziq community member

19 June 2018

2 replies

In your example of the tu form of appeler, is that correct?

j'appelle 

tu appelles   Shouldn't this be (t'appelles)? If not, why?

il/elle/on appelle

nous appelons

vous appelez

ils/elles appellent

Chris

Kwiziq community member

20 June 2018

20/06/18

Hi Lisa,


no, "tu appelles" is correct. There is no elision between the letters u and a. Almost all elisions happen between a preceding e and the following vowel. For a more encompassing list of possibilities look here:


https://www.lawlessfrench.com/pronunciation/elision/


-- Chris (not a native speaker).

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

21 June 2018

21/06/18

Hi Lisa,


Are you confusing "Tu t'appelles" which is the verb 's'appeler' (to be called/named) with the verb 'appeler' in the lesson which simply means 'to call'.


e.g.


"Tu appelles ta mère ce soir sans faute, d'accord?" (You are calling your mother tonight without fail, okay?)


"Tu t'appelles Marie, n'est-ce -pas?" (Your name is Marie, isnt' it ? ")


Hope this helps!

Sayali

Kwiziq community member

1 June 2018

4 replies

Bonjour Aurélie, Can you please suggest some good books to learn and practise French grammar?

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

4 June 2018

4/06/18

Hi Sayali,


My students used to find 'Mille et un points' by Neil Creighton, useful .


It's a compendium of French grammatical rules. You could then practise them in Kwiziq.


Hope this helps!

Sayali

Kwiziq community member

4 June 2018

4/06/18

Thank you, Cécile!

Sayali

Kwiziq community member

4 June 2018

4/06/18

Hi, can you also suggest a good French dictionary?

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

5 June 2018

5/06/18

Hi Sayali,


If you mean a bilingual anglo-French dictionary , I have always relied in book form on the Collins Robert French dictionary. People nowadays use online versions so you should be able to pick up a cheap second-hand one on various sites.


Hope this helps!

William

Kwiziq community member

29 January 2018

3 replies

Porquoi “tu appelles, pas de t’appelles?

Chris

Kwiziq community member

30 January 2018

30/01/18

Bonjour William,

On dit "tu appelles à quelqu'un" -- You are calling somebody. La phrase "je m'appelle Chris." veut dire que mon nom est Chris.

Appeler à quelqu'un. -- To call someone (on the phone).
Tu t'appelles Marie. -- Your name is Marie (literally: you call yourself Marie).

-- Chris.

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

30 January 2018

30/01/18

Bonjour William and Chris !

Chris, you are indeed mistaken here: appeler takes a direct object in French:
Tu appelles quelqu'un.


As for your question William, your confusion comes from the difference between appeler [quelqu'un] (to call [someone]), and the reflexive s'appeler (to be called / literally:"to call oneself").


In the first case, you'll use tu appelles (you call)
-> the subject pronoun tu never contracts into t' in written form (though you might have heard it in speech).


In the second case, you will use tu t'appelles (your name is)
-> t' is the contraction of the reflexive pronoun te


I hope that's helpful!
À bientôt !

Chris

Kwiziq community member

30 January 2018

30/01/18

Thanks, Aurélie!! I guess I drew a completely unwarranted parallel between "dire à quelqu'un" and "appeler". Goes to show that one can't ever take anything for granted when learning French :))

-- Chris.

Ron

Kwiziq community member

14 January 2018

2 replies

I cannot find the word encasteler in my dictionary. Can you please give me the English word for it.

Jean

Kwiziq community member

14 January 2018

14/01/18

It seems to be related to the noun " encastelure" which is a veterinary term for a disease of horses' hooves caused by the horse standing for too long in water or urine. Sounds horrible. I found this in a French veterinary text online, and of course , it did not give the English equivalent. (It's not foot rot because I looked that up also. That is "le pietin" with an acute accent which my current keyboard will not allow me to add. )

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

15 January 2018

15/01/18

Bonjour Ron !

This is indeed a very obscure verb, referring to a veterinary condition, as Jean said above.


s'encasteler - to be hoof bound

You could find the definition of this verb in our related lesson:
https://progress.lawlessfrench.com/revision/grammar/conjugate-eter-and-eler-verbs-in-le-present-exceptions-in-e-only


J'espère que cela vous est utile !
À bientôt !

Stevenson

Kwiziq community member

30 November 2017

1 reply

Example in wrong section/page

Je me promène dans le parc où vous vous promenez aussi. I'm taking a walk in the park where you're taking a walk too.

Ron

Kwiziq community member

9 December 2017

9/12/17

Bonjour Stevenson,
For this type of question, it is best to use the following link:
https://progress.lawlessfrench.com/contact-us
Be sure to include the lesson where you think there is a mistake.
bonne chance

Donald

Kwiziq community member

14 December 2016

1 reply

I like the prononciation form. Much clearer and now much more

difficult for us americans to say correctly.

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

15 December 2016

15/12/16

Merci Donald !

"C'est en forgeant que l'on devient forgeron !"
(Literally: It's by forging that you become a blacksmith.)
-> Practice makes perfect.
:)

Joakim

Kwiziq community member

13 June 2016

1 reply

e(xx)er

" verbs in -ETTER, -ELLER and -E(xx)ER " Why do you specifically mention ETTER and ELLER when they are alreafy matched by the general E(xx)ER pattern?

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

13 June 2016

13/06/16

Bonjour Joakim !

Given that we pointed out how -ETER and -ELER have a behaviour of their own, we thought appropriate to specify that when doubled, they behave like any other -E(xx)ER, and we mention them directly to avoid any confusion.

Christopher

Kwiziq community member

4 April 2016

2 replies

Not really a question, just pointing out something.

The -ETER and -ELER labels are before the wrong verbs. -ETER: agneler - celer - receler - ciseler - démanteler - écarteler - encasteler - geler (and derivatives: dégeler, congeler, surgeler) - marteler - modeler - peler - ELER: acheter (and derivatives: racheter)- bégueter - corseter - crocheter - fileter - fureter - haleter

Laura

Kwiziq language super star

5 April 2016

5/04/16

Bonjour Christopher,

Thanks for letting us know, we'll get that fixed right away.

Christopher

Kwiziq community member

5 April 2016

5/04/16

Pas de problème. Hey, I like this new feature! Also I noted the ability to force a lesson into my "rotation".

Bon travail!!
Let me take a look at that...