Aller à = to suit someone (expressions with aller)

We know that the verb aller means to go in French. Therefore aller à + location means to go to. But here is another use of aller à + person:

Le rose va à ma sœur.
Pink suits my sister.

Les chapeaux ne vont pas du tout à mon copain !
Hats don't suit my boyfriend at all!

Ce chapeau va vraiment bien à Margot.
This hat really suits Margot.

La grossesse va bien à ta femme.
Pregnancy suits your wife.

In French, the verb aller à + person can be used in the context of looking good, for example when trying on clothes, to say to suit [someone] / to fit [someone].

Note that you can use aller bien à (to suit well) or aller mal à (to suit badly/to ill-suit).

 

ATTENTION: In order to say it suits me/you/him/her/us/them... you cannot use à + stress pronoun, but rather need to use indirect object pronouns as such:

[the thing(s)] me/te/lui/nous/vous/leur [va (vont)].

Nous viendrons à 9 heures. Ça vous va ?
We'll come at 9. Is it ok with you?

Ça lui va ? - Oui, ça lui va parfaitement.
Is he ok with that? - Yes, he's perfectly fine with it.

Non, cette couleur ne lui va pas du tout!
No, this colour doesn't suit him/her at all

Cette coupe de cheveux me va bien, n'est-ce pas?
This haircut suits me, doesn't it?

 

 
Other usage:
You can also use aller à + person to ask/say that [someone] is fine with [something], i.e. that something suits you:

Nous viendrons à 9 heures. Ça vous va ?
We'll come at 9. Is it ok with you?

Ça lui va ? - Oui, ça lui va parfaitement.
Is he ok with that? - Yes, he's perfectly fine with it.

 

 

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Le rose va à ma sœur.
Pink suits my sister.


Cette coupe de cheveux me va bien, n'est-ce pas?
This haircut suits me, doesn't it?


Ça lui va ? - Oui, ça lui va parfaitement.
Is he ok with that? - Yes, he's perfectly fine with it.


Cette robe te va vraiment bien.
This dress really suits you.


La grossesse va bien à ta femme.
Pregnancy suits your wife.


Nous viendrons à 9 heures. Ça vous va ?
We'll come at 9. Is it ok with you?


Ce chapeau va vraiment bien à Margot.
This hat really suits Margot.


Ces chaussures ne me vont pas, elles sont trop petites!
These shoes don't fit me, they're too small!


Les chapeaux ne vont pas du tout à mon copain !
Hats don't suit my boyfriend at all!


Non, cette couleur ne lui va pas du tout!
No, this colour doesn't suit him/her at all


Q&A

Paul

Kwiziq community member

7 May 2018

3 replies

aller à and aller bien à

Can you please explain when to use bien. In the examples where bien is used it is sometimes translated as "really" and sometimes ignored in the translation.

Chris

Kwiziq community member

8 May 2018

8/05/18

Hi Paul,

the quesition you ask is a good one but very difficult to answer in general. The French bien has many different meanings in conjunction with other verbs and sometimes changes the implication of connotation of a sentence subtly.

And then there is the idiomatic use of bien, as in, e.g., être bien mal -- to be close to death. A small collection of bien and its uses can be found here: https://www.thoughtco.com/french-expressions-with-bien-1368647

I don't know of any rule you could memorize which would teach you all you need to know about bien. Just read and listen a lot and you'll pick it up eventually.

-- Chris (not a native speaker).

Alan

Kwiziq community member

8 May 2018

8/05/18

I think it's actually the word vraiment which is being translated as really.

Chris

Kwiziq community member

8 May 2018

8/05/18

Ce chapeau va vraiment bien à Margot. -- This hat suits Margot really well.

So here is a more literal translation of the French. As you can see and as Alan pointed out, vraiment is "really" and bien is "well". So in this example, bien is used just in its function as adverb of bon.

-- Chris.

carole

Kwiziq community member

19 February 2018

2 replies

One of the examples is: Nous viendrons à 9 heures. Ça vous va ?

Instead of Ça vous va ? would you say Ça vous êtes? Thank you

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

19 February 2018

19/02/18

Bonjour Carole !

No, in that context, ça vous va ?does it suit you ?
and you wouldn't be able to substitute être here.

Similarly, you wouldn't say Je suis bien to express I am fine, but Je vais bien.

I hope that's helpful!

Bonne journée !

Laura

Kwiziq language super star

19 February 2018

19/02/18

Bonjour Carole,

In Ça vous va, the subject is ça and the object is vous, that's why the verb has to be third person singular va rather than second person plural allez. And as Aurélie said, it has to be the verb aller, not être.

Michael

Kwiziq community member

30 September 2017

1 reply

More emphasis on 'to fit'

I think the lesson does not currently explain clearly enough the use of 'Aller à' to mean 'to fit.' It is only mentioned once in passing in the initial explanation, and there is no associated example phrase at that point. In fact, there is only one phrase using it in this sense in the entire lesson, mixed in with nine other phrases in the examples and resources. I didn't get the second correct answer in question two of the Kwik Kwiz, mainly because of the lack focus on this meaning in the lesson. I think a minor tweak would make the lesson more balanced in explaining the different meanings of 'Aller à' Thanks, Michael P.s. I love the whole approach of Progress with Lawless French, and find it really addictive, which must surely be a good thing when learning a language.

Ron

Kwiziq community member

4 October 2017

4/10/17

Bonjour Michael, I had to revert to my stand-by resource, la Collins-Robert Dictionnaire, to find this particular locution in more detail and here is what it says: (= convenir) aller à qn [couleur, style] to suit sb [forme, pointure] to fit sb [dispositions, date] to suit sb cela me va [couleur, vêtement] it suits me (pointure, taille) it fits me [projet, dispositions] it suits me, that's OK by me ⇒ Cette robe te va bien. That dress suits you. aller avec qch [couleurs, style] to go with sth bien aller avec qch to go well with sth C'est tel, ce chapeau-ci me va bien ! --> This hat suits me, fits me just fine. Bonne chance,

Cameron

Kwiziq community member

15 December 2016

4 replies

So what is the best way to ask: Does that work for you? Or, will that work for you?

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

16 December 2016

16/12/16

Bonjour Cameron ! In a professional context, talking for example about a meeting date, you could use: "Est-ce que ça/cela vous convient ?" Do you have a specific context in mind? À bientôt !

Cameron

Kwiziq community member

16 December 2016

16/12/16

I was thinking more between friends in talking about getting together sometime or somewhere. Such as, "I can't make it to your house tomorrow but I can come the day after instead. Will that work for you?" I'm in Côte d'Ivoire and the french is more casual here I think. I have heard, ça peut aller? or just ca va? Just wondering if there is a better way to say it.

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

19 December 2016

19/12/16

Bonjour Cameron ! Yes, in an informal context, you could simply say "Ça (te) va ?", that's perfectly colloquial :)

John

Kwiziq community member

23 April 2017

23/04/17

Would "Ça marche?" work here as well?

John

Kwiziq community member

2 February 2016

2 replies

Why is the indirect object pronoun required with this expression?

The verb aller does not require à so the direct object pronoun seems more correct. Also the direct object pronoun seems even more correct in the negative, when the clothing does not suit someone. Thanks.

Laura

Kwiziq language super star

2 February 2016

2/02/16

Bonjour John, The expression is "aller à" = to suit. For this meaning, the preposition is required, so that means the indirect object pronoun is required. Also, it's impossible to use aller + direct object, for any meaning.

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

2 February 2016

2/02/16

Bonjour John, The expression "aller à quelqu'un" (i.e. to suit someone) literally means "to go to someone", so it asks for an indirect object pronoun. E.g. Ce pull me va. (This jumper suits me.) [lit: This jumper goes TO me.] I hope that's helpful!

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