Talking about the weather with il y a + [noun]

Look at these sentences:

Il y a du soleil
It is sunny

Il y a du vent
It is windy

Il y a du brouillard
It is foggy

Il y a de l'orage
It is stormy

Il y a des nuages
It is cloudy

Il y a de la pluie aujourd'hui.
It's rainy today.

Il y a de la brume.
It's misty.

To talk about the weather in French, you will use Il y a + du / de la / de l' / des  + noun. (Literally: there is some ...).

Note that du / de la / de l' or des agree with the noun following.


Case of il fait du soleil or Il fait soleil: This seems to be presented as idiomatic in a lot of French learning methods, and to be perfectly honest, some French people use it. However, it is not good French and still sounds clunky and child-like to many French ears (including mine!). 
Il fait should always be followed by an adjective, and il y a used with nouns. 


Note that you could also use Le temps est + adjective (ensoleillé, pluvieux, nuageux, brumeux, orageux) instead of using il y a + noun.  
BUT there is no adjective for brouillard (fog), or vent (wind).

See also Talking about the weather with il fait + [adjective]

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources


Il y a du soleil
It is sunny


Il y a des nuages
It is cloudy


Il y a de l'orage
It is stormy


Il y a de la brume.
It's misty.


Il y a du vent
It is windy


Il y a de la pluie aujourd'hui.
It's rainy today.


Il y a du brouillard
It is foggy


Q&A

Alexander

Kwiziq community member

16 April 2019

3 replies

"Il fait should always be followed by an adjective, and il y a used with nouns."

Alexander

Kwiziq community member

16 April 2019

16/04/19

So why would one say "Il fait soleil", as soleil is a noun ?

Chris

Kwiziq community member

16 April 2019

16/04/19

Where did you see that sentence?

Alexander

Kwiziq community member

16 April 2019

16/04/19

Ah...

Ignore me actually :-|

I've just read the explanation again and it says:

"Case of il fait du soleil or Il fait soleil: This seems to be presented as idiomatic in a lot of French learning methods,"

I missed that is is an idiom before, sorry!

Bizainakhamis

Kwiziq community member

15 April 2019

1 reply

how can i say that there is rainy and sun

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

18 May 2019

18/05/19

Hi Bizainakhamis,

 You could say -

'Il pleut et il fait soleil en même temps.'

 

Kristin

Kwiziq community member

11 April 2019

2 replies

How do you say it was cloudy (past tense)?

Chris

Kwiziq community member

12 April 2019

12/04/19

Assuming that the statement is in a context where the imparfait is needed:

Il faisait nuageux.Il y avait des nuages.

Kristin

Kwiziq community member

13 April 2019

13/04/19

Thanks!

Sagar

Kwiziq community member

6 February 2019

2 replies

Should one always use "Il y a" when describing the weather?

I know certain kinds of weather are expressed with a direct verb, like:

* il pleut

* il neige

* il tonne

But there seems to be multiple ways of describing other kinds of weather, like "it's sunny." I've heard:

* il y a du soleil (which is the example in this lesson)

but also:

* c'est ensoleillé

I've heard both:

* il y a des nuages

as well as:

* c’est nuageux

Are all these versions correct? Is one preferred or in more common use than the other?Thanks!

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

6 February 2019

6/02/19

Hi Sagar,

They are all possible and correct... do no forget the use ‘il fait’ also to express the weather as in the following lesson -

https://progress.lawlessfrench.com/revision/grammar/talking-about-the-weather-expressions-with-il-fait

 

Sagar

Kwiziq community member

6 February 2019

6/02/19

Merci, Cécile !

Robin

Kwiziq community member

2 January 2019

2 replies

suggestion: lesson title could be improved if add (+noun)

I think the lesson title could be improved if this was added (+ noun). Just a suggestion, merci!

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

7 January 2019

7/01/19

Bonjour Robin !

Thank you for that great suggestion! I've now uodated the lesson title, as well as this "sister" lesson : "Talking about the weather with il fait + [adjective]"

Merci et Bonne Année !

Robin

Kwiziq community member

7 January 2019

7/01/19

Bonjour and thank you so much!  I would understand if you chose not to update the title, yet I am so pleased you have, because I look at the titles as I am studying a lesson to help me better comprehend concepts.   Sometimes I might have trouble grasping concept of a particular lesson, but then I take another look at the title which helps me with my comprehension. 

Nignuoy

Kwiziq community member

8 November 2018

1 reply

Difference between brouillard & brumeux?

Besides brouillard being a noun and brumeux being an adjective, how are the two different? It says in the lesson that there is no adjective for brouillard (fog), but a search on word reference shows that brumeux means foggy. How come it says there is no adjective for brouillard then?

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

8 November 2018

8/11/18

Bonjour Nignuoy !

"brumeux" means "misty"  :)

Bonne journée !

Nhu

Kwiziq community member

2 October 2018

2 replies

Adjective of "vent"

Hello, I was wondering if "venteux" is accepted as an adjective that you can use with "le temps est + adjective" 

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

3 October 2018

3/10/18

Hi Nhu,

I would not use 'venteux' to talk about the weather.

You can say, 'Il vente' ( like:  il pleut or il neige ) but it is very formal.

Il fait du vent 

or even,

il y a du vent aujourd'hui

is also possible ...

'Venteux' is used as an adjective to talk about something which is 'subject to wind'.

e.g.

Cette plage /cette saison est très venteuse This beach/this season  is very windy

Les haricots sont venteux = Beans give you wind ( flatulence) 

Hope this helps!

 

Miller

Kwiziq community member

10 May 2019

10/05/19

Les haricots sont venteux is the funniest thing I've learned in French in a while. Ha! Merci.

mar

Kwiziq community member

27 January 2018

3 replies

what happened to the microquizzes? I found them really helpful before. thanks!

Bernadette

Kwiziq community member

29 January 2018

29/01/18

I am wondering the same thing...

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

30 January 2018

30/01/18

Bonjour Mar and Bernadette ! We had some issues with the microkwizzes which unfortunately meant that we have had to remove that feature temporarily. We are looking at how to properly implement the feature as we are aware they were popular. In the meantime, as a workaround: to quiz on a single lesson you can use the "Add to notebook" button and kwiz against the notebook - each kwiz will select a different question each time. Sorry for the inconvenience. Bonne journée !

Gruff

Kwiziq language super star

16 February 2018

16/02/18

You'll be pleased to know micro kwizzes have been restored. You can read more here:

https://progress.lawlessfrench.com/blog/micro-kwizzes-back/

 

 

Chris

Kwiziq community member

4 January 2018

3 replies

Il fait vent or Il y a du vent

Hello Kwiziq staff, I read your paragraph about the use of "Il fait ___" being idiomatic and somewhat clunky-sounding. For me, I have been instructed to say "Il fait vent" more times than I can remember (and is found in The Ultimate French Review and Practice, Premium 3rd Edition as a standard weather expression) and have not heard of "Il y a du vent" yet in my studies before encountering this question on your website.

Chris

Kwiziq community member

4 January 2018

4/01/18

Sorry, the post submitted before I finished typing. Just wanted to ask if it's really "wrong" to say "il fait vent" when it seems to be so widely accepted in the language, and not just idiomatically. I really appreciate your website and I believe it's noticeably helping me to improve my French. Je vous remercie!

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

4 January 2018

4/01/18

Hi Chris,

Il fait vent is not correct - 'Il fait du vent 'is correct and it means the same as 'il y a du vent'.

Glad you like the site, thanks for the feedback!

Chris

Kwiziq community member

4 January 2018

4/01/18

I'm sorry, yes I meant "Il fait du vent." I posted just before going to bed. ;) Thanks so much for your response!

Graham

Kwiziq community member

9 October 2017

4 replies

Hi. If I was describing the day or night, how would you say, "It is a cold foggy night"?

Ron

Kwiziq community member

9 October 2017

9/10/17

Bonjour Graham, There are a couple of possibilities with this locution: C’est une nuit de brouillard froide La nuit fait froide et il y a du brouillard. C'est une nuit qui fait froide et il y a du brouillard. Now, I may be out in the cold (no pun intended) with these and if so, I would hope the kwiziq team provides a more suitable explanation Bonne chance.

Ron

Kwiziq community member

9 October 2017

9/10/17

There is also another locution that might be more appropriate: C'est une nuit froide et brumeuse Like I indicated earlier, there are multiple locutions possible to explain that. I have heard said that the French love to discuss the weather and, as such, I have noticed that there are many ways to state things about the weather, i.e. il fait. . ., il y a . . ., etc. J'espère que ma réponse vous aiderait. Bonne chance et bonne continuation dans vos études en français, la langue de Molière et qui a été utilisé par le monde français depuis l’époque d’Hugues Capet

Chris

Kwiziq community member

17 October 2017

17/10/17

A quick note on the weather, there are generally three patterns to use: 1) Il fait beau/froid/chaud/etc. 2) Il y a du soleil, du vent, du bruillard, etc. 3) C'est ensoleillé, venteux, nuageux, etc. -- Chris (no native speaker).

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

6 October 2018

6/10/18

iI Graham,

I like: 

C'est une nuit froide et brumeuse.

Hope this helps!

Thinking...